In other news

Cognitive Daily

Category archives for In other news

My column for SEEDMAGAZINE.COM today covers the fascinating research on perceptual illusions. While these illusions are often amazing in their own right, what’s more important is what they tell us about the visual system, and how common they really are: Are you sitting in a swivel office chair as you read this article? Would you…

My picks from ResearchBlogging.org

In case you missed them, here are the posts I chose as “Editor’s Selections” yesterday for ResearchBlogging.org. The amazing malleability of our body image. Volunteers felt real pain watching someone hurt a fake hand. Can we use EEG to predict whether an antidepressant will be effective? Maybe, but only if researchers are allowed to test…

My column on SEEDMAGAZINE.COM today discusses recent research on acupuncture: The science behind acupuncture is dubious. It’s difficult to properly control an acupuncture study because its practitioners–and those receiving treatment–are heavily invested in the results. In a Norwegian study of acupuncture as treatment for hot flashes during menopause, 80 out of 535 volunteers dropped out…

Fake videos lead to real confessions

In case you missed them, here are my selections from the psychology and neuroscience posts on ResearchBlogging.org for the past week: Confronted with fake video evidence, nearly everyone confesses. In a simulated “crime,” researchers were able to induce false confessions — but fewer people were willing to rat out others. Second language changes the way…

My picks from ResearchBlogging.org

In case you missed them, these are my picks from ResearchBlogging.org’s psychology and neuroscience categories. Neat stuff! Neurological basis for desire for amputation. This post explains why some people have a seemingly rational desire for a healthy limb to be removed. Are humans genetically predisposed to cheat on their mates? An anthropologist examines the evidence,…

Why do only *some* adults drink milk?

Over at Seedmagazine.com, my new column “Research Blogging” debuted today. Every Wednesday I’ll be discussing what’s new in the research blogosphere, and this week I cover a fascinating post by Jeremy Yoder about lactose tolerance in adults. Here’s a sample: The researchers say the lactase gene evolved in Europe because Europeans don’t get enough sun…

Over at ResearchBlogging.org, in addition to my other duties, I’m serving as the Psychology/Neuroscience editor. Every week starting today, I’ll be making “Editor’s selections” — choose the top posts in these fields. For your convenience, I’m also sharing them here. Enjoy! Here’s one for your boss: Computer Games at Work are Good For You. With…

Encephalon, the biweekly collection of the best psychology and neuroscience posts on the web, is now available at Neuroanthropology. In addition to great science, there’s a collection of clips from a classic movie about Italian food, “Big Night.” Here’s my favorite:

The New York Times has an interesting article about the latest international math/science testing. American kids actually fared pretty well, behind just a few other countries. More focused testing on individual states puts Massachusetts kids behind only Taiwan and Singapore. Encephalon is up at Living the Scientific Life Skills for Healthy Living blog reports that…

Bora’s hosting the first-ever edition of a new history of science carnival, “The Giant’s Shoulders,” which promises to focus attention on great research from years past, once a month. All participants review a journal article or other report of science from their field of expertise. The catch is that the science being reviewed must be…