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Spot the fake smile

There’s a fun little test over at the BBC: Spot the fake smile (via Green Ideas). Try to spot the difference between fake smiles and real smiles! I got 17 out of 20. It helps to understand the research about authentic smiles. Update: Now I’m curious. I wonder if our readers are really that good,…

Eric Kandel Interview

ScienceBlogs.de, our German counterpart, is featuring an English-language interview with Nobel Laureate Eric Kandel: Pertinent to Tuesday’s post, he discusses free will, and also drug treatment for behavior disorders, the unification of the sciences, and Sigmund Freud.

Upcoming presentations

This coming Friday I’ll be at the NISO Discovery Tools Forum in Chapel Hill, NC, to talk about ResearchBlogging.org, along with fellow ResearchBlogger and librarian Eric Schnell. Here’s the abstract for our presentation: ResearchBlogging.org began simply as a way for academic bloggers to identify serious and public posts in what can also be a frivolous…

Take a look at this amazing video (via slashdot) showing how traffic jams can occur even when all the drivers are attempting to drive the identical speed. As you can see, at first everything works fine — the drivers have all been instructed to try to drive about 30 KPH. But almost inevitably everything goes…

Encephalon is back at SharpBrains

The Encephalon blog carnival is up and running at SharpBrains after a short hiatus. Check it out for the latest great posts in psychology and neuroscience.

I’m posting this live from my presentation at the Science Blogging conference. My session is entitled “How to build interactivity into your blog,” and this post offers some links that I discuss in the presentation. Polling services Blog Flux polls Quimble Survey web sites Question Pro Survey Monkey Survey Gizmo Reviews of polling and survey…

There’s been a lot of discussion online lately about the relative importance of the position of an author name. Is it more impressive to be a first author on a report? If so, how much? John Lynch made a graph of Guillermo Gonzalez’s publication record as a way of illustrating his argument that Gonzalez didn’t…

I’ve reviewed Sandra and Matthew Blakeslee’s recent book The Body Has a Mind of Its Own over at The Quarterly Conversation. So, is this the science book that should have made the New York Times’ Notable Books list? (Several ScienceBloggers have complained that the list includes no science books). As I point out in my…

The way subliminal advertising is portrayed in movies and hyped in some media outlets, briefly and imperceptibly flashing a brand name during a TV show can turn people into mindless cyborgs who can’t resist the urge to shop at a particular store or drink a certain brand of beer. Overhyped as these claims may be,…

Is there really wisdom in crowds?

Here’s an interesting article about the wisdom of crowds. It starts by discussing the surprising accuracy of Wikipedia. The reason that Wikipedia is as good as it is (and the reason that living organisms are as sophisticated as they are), is not due to the average quality of the edits (or mutations). Instead, it is…