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Category archives for Opinion

In a recent opinion piece appearing in the Washington Post, Jason Johnson argues that in today’s cut-and-paste world, the term paper is becoming irrelevant: Today I plagiarized multiple documents at work. I took the writing of others and presented it to my supervisor as if it were my own. It was an open secret that…

There’s been a lot of news about robots lately, so I thought I’d take the opportunity to synthesize what’s going on in this field and offer a bit of speculation about where robotics is headed. First: From Neurodudes comes news of an artificial robotic limb that not only responds to nerve impulses but also has…

Today I’m going to be working with some students in Greta’s course “Psychology Goes to the Movies” to help them write CogDaily-style reports on scholarly research. With any luck, you’ll see their reports here this summer! I thought CogDaily readers might be interested in some of the principles I’ll be sharing with Greta’s students, so…

For some reason I can’t resist watching Steve Jobs’ Apple keynote speeches. I watched six years ago when he introduced the iPod, and I watched again last night when he introduced his latest “revolutionary” product. People were amazed when the iPod was introduced — but a little shocked by the price. I didn’t buy an…

Gualtiero Piccinini writes: I always put my papers online. I used to publish online a penultimate version, under the assumption that since it’s not identical to the published version, it’s ok. Lately, taking a cue from the copyright form of Australasian Journal of Philosophy, I’ve started posting the last version sent to the publisher (before…

Nature’s report on open peer review

I was on the way out the door for a vacation when the journal Nature published its much-anticipated report on the results of its open peer review experiment, but I did want to offer a few comments on the report, even if I’m arriving to the discussion a bit late. Peer review, of course, is…

Clinician Dr. Louann Brizendine is quoted in the New York Times as saying that she doesn’t do research because “I don’t want to give patients a placebo. It’s cruel.” The interviewer pushes her on the issue, pointing out that in the long term, controlled studies are necessary in order to determine the efficacy of treatments.…

Over at The Quarterly Conversation, I’ve written a review of George Lakoff’s book Whose Freedom? In case my personal politics haven’t come through in my CogDaily posts (and I do make an effort to assume a neutral perspective here), you’ll get a good sense of my views in this review, where I point out that…

Do “Blink” methods really work?

Larry Moran thinks I have the wrong idea about teaching evaluations and “thin slicing”: Unfortunately, Dave Munger seems to draw the wrong conclusions from this study as he explains in an earlier posting [The six-second teacher evaluation]. In that article from last May he says … So we do appear to be quite effective at…

In 1981, the economist Lester C. Thurow wrote an article for the New York Times entitled “Why women are paid less than men.” If you have a subscription, you can still read it on the Times web site. My copy comes from an anthology I edited in 1992. Thurow’s conclusion: The decade between 25 and…