Reasoning

Cognitive Daily

Category archives for Reasoning

Suppose your organization is interviewing candidates for an important job. Would it be better for one trusted person to have an extended interview with them, or for several people to talk to them for less time? How many people would you need to conduct the interviews? Would three be enough? Would ten be too many?…

Take a look at this video from last night’s episode of Jon Stewart’s “The Daily Show.” If you’d like, you can skip past all the political snark to the 4:47 mark to watch Jon bring cognitive psychology into prime time (or at least latenight cable)! That’s right; you saw it: Jon Stewart mentioned the psychological…

As an undergraduate, at my school it was practically a requirement to steal silverware from the campus cafeteria. There were students who’d commandeered full sets of china. The desk clerk at my dorm used to say that the only thing we were learning from our college education was “how to steal.” Somehow it didn’t seem…

Does rewarding altruism squelch it?

Imagine your neighbor has a dog that regularly escapes her yard. One day you see the dog escape and return it to her. She thanks you by giving you a piece of delicious home-made apple pie. This happens several days in a row. Then one day when you return the dog, there’s no pie, no…

How did you decide to read this post? You might have seen the headline in an RSS reader or noticed it on the ScienceBlogs home page. Maybe someone emailed or tweeted the link to you. But you still had to make the decision to actually read it. How do you know when you made that…

[This post was originally published in September, 2007] Here’s a task that four-year-olds can do but three-year-olds have some trouble with. Imagine Sally in the picture below is playing with a ball. She puts the ball in the box and goes to the kitchen to get a drink. While she’s gone, Bill takes the ball…

Implicit attitudes and associations can tell us a lot about a person. It’s a way to find out if they might have a racial or gender bias, and recently there has even been some work suggesting that an implicit association test can tell us whether someone is lying — it’s called the autobiographical Implicit Association…

[Originally posted in April 2007] Cognitive decline as we age is all over the news lately. “Brain fitness” products are available for cell phones, Game Boys, and Xboxes, all designed to prevent the natural decline in cognitive ability as we age. There’s even a significant body of work suggesting that this sort of product really…

When school budgets are cut, programs in music and the arts are often the first to get axed. While this makes a certain amount of sense because music isn’t always considered “essential” to education, recently in the U.S. we’re starting to see another justification for cutting music out of schools. The No Child Left Behind…

Is less always more?

My computer has over 5,000 songs on it — 16.2 days’ worth, according to my music-playing software. So how do I pick what song to listen to? More often than not, I just shuffle the whole list and play whatever album shows up on top. But if I’m in the car listening to the radio,…