Archives for January, 2010

I couldn’t agree more with Bonnie Swoger’s sentiment that academic librarians need to stop going to library conferences, although I perhaps might not go that far. In any case, the last couple of weeks have been pretty fallow blogging weeks for me and I just can’t seem to come up with any original commentary on…

So far, I’m pretty iPad-agnostic — mostly curious to see if it can burst out of it’s obvious niche applications and become a mass device like the iPod or iPhone. However, The Onion’s article just before the big announcement day really struck a funny bone: Claiming that he completely forgot about the much-hyped electronic device…

Best Science Books 2009: Amazon.ca

Oddly and interestingly, Amazon.ca has a different list that the US parent. The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind: Creating Currents of Electricity & Hope by William Kamkwamba Fordlandia: The Rise and Fall of Henry Ford’s Forgotten Jungle City by Greg Grandin Wicked Plants: A Book of Botanical Atrocities by Amy Stewart The Lost City of…

I thought I’d combine a couple lists that only have a couple of relevant items. January Magazine The Sun and the Moon: The Remarkable True Account of Hoaxers, Showmen, Dueling Journalists, and Lunar Man-Bats in Nineteenth-Century New York by Matthew Goodman The Bizarre and Incredible World of Plants by Wolfgang Stuppy Flow: The Cultural Story…

Music Mondays: Five songs I love

It’s been a while since I did one of these fairly general entries in the “Five songs I love” series: Forget about Me by Mem Shannon. A great blues/soul/R&B singer, Mem Shannon is terribly underrated. I love his great story-telling ability, of which Forget about Me is a great example. Live: A Night at Tipitina’s…

Authorial control

Horror author Cherie Priest has a very nice post from a couple of days ago called Control. It’s basically about what mass market fiction authors do and don’t have control over in the book production process. Now, the mass market fiction publishing niche is hardly the main concern on this blog, but I also think…

Excellent post with a lot of great comments. Let’s take a look at what Scalzi doesn’t miss: Stupidly expensive long-distance charges. Crappy old cars. Which cars qualify as crappy old cars? In my opinion, pretty much all of them. Pre-catalytic converter cars were shoddily-constructed, lead-spewing deathtraps, the first generation of cars running on unleaded were…

The Reference and User Services Association of the American Library Association has released it’s list of 2009 Notable Books. The Lost City of Z: A Tale of Deadly Obsession in the Amazon by David Grann The Age of Wonder: How the Romantic Generation Discovered the Beauty and Terror of Science by Richard Holmes

Best Science Books 2009: The Times

A pretty extensive list from The London Times, across multiple categories: science, stocking stuffers, biography, graphic novels and nature. Mad Science: 100 Amazing Experiments From The History Of Science by Reto Schneider How To Make A Tornado: The Strange And Wonderful Things That Happen When Scientists Break Free by The New Scientist Bad Science by…

This one is pretty funny, from McSweeny’s: INT. UNIVERSITY FOOD COURT. SUNDAY AFTERNOON. JULY 15TH, 1945. HANS BETHE, EDWARD TELLER, and ROBERT SERBER sit at a table. There are notebooks, laptops, and expensive coffees arranged on the table. All three wear hoodies, basketball shorts, and flip flops. Serber is texting on his Blackberry Storm. Teller…

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