Archives for April, 2010

From The Cronk of Higher Education, New First Year Experience Class: How To Not Be An Asshole, this is very funny. The six-week class is comprised of five modules: So You’re Drunk: A Guide To Quietly Stumbling Home Street Signs Are Not Dorm Room Decorations Streaking: A Fast-Track To Suspension Noises Neighbors Hate To Hear…

A great two-part series on great computing museums from the last few issues of Communications of the ACM (here and here). The museums they profile are: The Computer History Museum The Heinz Nixdorf MuseumsForum The Science Museum in London The Deutches Museum U.S. National Museum of American History I’ll include an extra bit from the…

This one’s on Cracked.com and, unusually for them, is Safe for Work. Now, I’m down with making education more interactive, social, customizable, multitasking, multimedia and web-enabled and all that, but for every good thing there are potential downsides. And Cracked’s article nicely sums up some of the more, shall we say, absurd and ridiculous implications…

A small selection from some tables of content from a few recent journals and proceedings. These will require subscription access to the ACM Digital Library. Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education Connecting k-16 curriculum & policy: making computer science engaging, accessible, and hospitable for underrepresented students by Joanna Goode Computational thinking for the sciences: a…

That’s the topic for the most recent Schubmehl-Prein Prize for Best Essay on Social Impact of Computing. The Schubmehl-Prein Prize for best analysis of the social impact of a particular aspect of computing technology will be awarded to a student who is a high school junior in academic year 2009-2010. The first-place award is $1,000,…

If you love sword & sorcery books and stories (and who doesn’t!), SF Signal has one of their Mind Meld features in which they ask a bunch of writers and editors to name their favourites of the genre. Here’s a taste: Lou Anders “Ill met in Lankhmar” tops any list. How could it not? Fafhrd…

A month or so ago I posted on Scholarly Societies: Why Bother?, basically on the challenges that scholarly societies face in the digital age. I got a few good comments, getting a nice discussion going. I also posed a few questions directly to scholarly societies but unfortunately didn’t get any comments from any of the…

From Twitter, here’s the announcement: Have you ever sent out a “tweet” on the popular Twitter social media service? Congratulations: Your 140 characters or less will now be housed in the Library of Congress. That’s right. Every public tweet, ever, since Twitter’s inception in March 2006, will be archived digitally at the Library of Congress.…

This is one of those books that I just seemed to argue with constantly while I was reading it. You know, “Hey, you, book, you’re just plain wrong about this!” But, as much as I argued with it, as much as I wanted all of the main points to be wrong, as much as I…

There’s a massive libraryland industry organized around figuring out what students want from us in terms of space, collections, services, etc. We survey, observe and focus group them to death. And that’s great and incredibly valuable. But sometimes I think we might have a tendency to see what we want when we’re observing and they…

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