Archives for September, 2010

Your Hate Mail Will be Graded: A Decade of Whatever, 1998-2008 is a collection of John Scalzi’s favourite posts from the first decade of his blog’s existence. And it’s quite a collection too — of course one that is best taken in short doses, one or two posts per day over a longish period of…

A photo tour of the Large Hadron Collider Does Every Question Matter? An American In Paris Says Au Revoir To His Laptop U of Calgary Library Video Game Collection rocks Twitter! and Video game centre installed on campus Accessibility isn’t a “feature”: Responding to a drive-by comment A collaborative proposal on research metrics Where can…

I’m a life-long fan of science fiction, mostly as a reader but occasionally as a book reviewer. Way back, when dinosaurs walked the earth, I even took a couple of science fiction literature classes. And, as readers of this blog well know, I love nothing better than a good list of books. So combining all…

It’s time for the annual Mocking of the Thomson Reuters session. They’re at it again. Can the winners of the Nobel Prize be correctly predicted? Since 1989, Thomson Reuters has developed a list of likely winners in medicine, chemistry, physics, and economics. Those chosen are named Thomson Reuters Citation Laureates — researchers likely to be…

Almost Halfway There: an Analysis of the Open Access Behaviors of Academic Librarians The eReaders Bill of Rights (the Kobo Perspective) Plagiarism and essay mills Do Students Listen to Others’ Views? Bad at Math? Visualizing the Science Blogosphere (and Open-Sourcing It) Writing: Find the Time or Don’t Mind-bending mysteries at the Perimeter Institute The 10…

Having started my working life as a software developer, I know a bit about epic bugs. Let’s just say I’ve had my share and leave it at that. At very least, I can say I never caused any vehicles to crash or any companies to fail. So, from ComputerWorld, Epic failures: 11 infamous software bugs.…

12 Rules for New (Academic) Administrators The Facebook Reckoning Kickin’ it old-school: The rise of the mature student In the context of web context: How to check out any Web page Value of Academic Libraries Report SIMCITY by Neil Gaiman On open data and disruptive innovation Data mash-ups and the future of mapping Research Data:…

I know I’m sure as hell having a hard time keeping up with all the comings and goings. If anything, the impression is probably that the lights are practically out and we’re all singing Old Lang Syne. This, of course, is far from the case. The lights are still on, we’re most of us blogging…

From this day forward, Scott Rosenberg is an honorary librarian. One of the things that librarians talk about a lot is how to evaluate a random web page — what signs and signals to look for that will give the unsuspecting student a clue as to whether or not they might want to use a…

Welcome to YASBC: Wired Science Blogs

Yet another science blogging community: Wired Science Blogs. From Meet the New Wired Science All-Star Bloggers: At Wired Science we are always looking for new ways to deliver you more science and more awesome. Starting today, we are bringing on a group of hand-picked, superstar science bloggers to help us do just that. *snip* We…

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