Archives for October, 2010

It’s Open Access Week this week and as part of the celebrations I thought I highlight a recent declaration by the Open Bibliographic Working Group on the Principles for Open Bibliographic Data. It’s an incredible idea, one that I support completely — the aim is to make bibliographic data open, reusable and remixable. Creating a…

A really interesting article on Tor.com from this past August by Ryan Britt, A Fondness for Antiques: The Future of Books According to Science Fiction. In the past few years, media pundits and tech experts have been abuzz with variations on the question: “what is the future of the book?” Luckily, science fiction has been…

Blogging groups and ethics

The latest Cites & Insights (v10i11) is out and in it Walt Crawford explores some of the recent developments in the blogging landscape in a section called The Zeitgeist: Blogging Groups and Ethics. It’s a very good overview and analysis of what’s going on both in the science and librarian blogospheres. It’s well worth checking…

STEM Education Has Little to Do With Flowers When an imploring librarian is not enough Investments in the Term Economy Reference Management with the iPad Reference Management meets Web 2.0 Library mobile apps vs web apps – Some analysis Conversing in a Cyberspace Community: The Growth of HPS (History and Philosophy of Science) Blogging Oxford…

Ah, The Onion. I haven’t used them in a while for my Friday Fun and it was feeling like it was way overdue. As usual, classic stuff: Historians Admit To Inventing Ancient Greeks: A group of leading historians held a press conference Monday at the National Geographic Society to announce they had “entirely fabricated” ancient…

This graphic novel series is simply amazing. It’s some of the best graphic pure storytelling I’ve come across in a very long time — I just can’t recommend it enough. The story is perfectly paced: slow when it needs to be but mostly taut and exciting, pulling you from episode to episode like a freight…

The Genius of the Tinkerer: The secret to innovation is combining odds and ends A Call for Open Textbooks Self-archiving diary by Peter Suber So what does a science librarian DO? Book Futures: A Crowdsourced Thought Experiment Frontiers, F1000, PLoS One, Mendeley et al., brace yourselves Social Media & Library Advocacy The 9 Worst Ways…

This year’s Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing took place this past week in Atlanta, GA. I thought I’d gather together some small part of the blog posts I’ve been seeing floating around the Internets on this wonderful event. Opening Session of Grace Hopper Conference – 2010 Dancing with Hundreds of Technical Women at…

Ebooks Don’t Cannibalize Print, People Do The Why, When, Where, How of publishing data Libraries Make it Personal Make The Revolution (Anil Dash on social media & social movements) Searching For Better Research Habits Digitizing the Personal Library Good Freely Available Textbooks on Machine Learning Faculty, librarians and student research skills: are we on parallel…

You can always tell it’s Nobel season — because that’s when the Ig Nobel prizes are announced! The 2010 laureates have been announced. Here are some “highlights:” ENGINEERING PRIZE: Karina Acevedo-Whitehouse and Agnes Rocha-Gosselin of the Zoological Society of London, UK, and Diane Gendron of Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Baja California Sur, Mexico, for perfecting a…

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