Archives for October, 2011

Books I’d like to read

Another list of books for your reading and collection development pleasure. Abelard to Apple: The Fate of American Colleges and Universities by Richard A. DeMillo When academics get together to talk about the future, they talk mainly to each other, but the American system of higher education has many more stakeholders than that. Over the…

With The Onion implementing a new paywall with non-US users, I’m forced to look for a new source of cheap amusement. Yes, I’m too cheap to pay for The Onion online. For a paper copy, I’d easily pay $5 per week but online infotainment has no monetary value for me, and I suspect for anyone…

Will Amazon kill off book publishers?

As reported here and elsewhere, Amazon is actually dipping its toes into the world of publishing. Which of course is an interesting challenge and threat for traditional trade publishers. And who knows, maybe academic publishers too, if Amazon decides it wants to disrupt that market as well. In any case, The New York Times has…

Ah, #OccupyScholComm. The perfect Open Access Week topic! And just like the broader Occupy protests movement, the aims and policy pronouncements of the “movement” are perhaps not as vague as they might seem to the casual observer. Basically, #OccupyScholComm is about scholars rejecting profit-driven toll-access publishing and taking back the control of their own scholarly…

Books I’d like to read

For your reading and collection development pleasure! Planned Obsolescence: Publishing, Technology, and the Future of the Academy by Kathleen Fitzpatrick Academic institutions are facing a crisis in scholarly publishing at multiple levels: presses are stressed as never before, library budgets are squeezed, faculty are having difficulty publishing their work, and promotion and tenure committees are…

I like to think of Nobel Week as stretching through the entirety of October and certainly The Cronk has made that much easier this year with a fun little article, Nobel Prize Committee Snubs Professor Huckman’s Bigfoot Research Again! For the thirteenth time in thirteen years, Professor Mikael Huckman’s write-in campaign to the Nobel Prize…

Social Media for Scientists Part 1: It’s Our Job Social Media for Scientists Part 2: You Do Have Time Social Media for Scientists Part 2.5: Breaking Stereotypes Social Media For Scientists Part 3: Win-Win The economics of science blogging The three things I learned at the Purdue Conference for Pre-Tenure Women: on being a radical…

I’ve long been a believer in the power of blogs to drive and aggregate conversations at every level. Frivolous, for sure. But also serious and scholarly. The rise of science blogs over the last few years has certainly demonstrated that. In librarianship as well, blogs are a powerful source of comment, theory and practical advice.…

Friday Fun: 31 Days of Halloween!

The science fiction news site blastr has a very entertaining series going for the month of October, 31 Days of Halloween. As you would imagine, every day this month they are featuring a post about Halloween. And fortunately the topics range from the bizarre to the ridiculous all the way to the barely safe for…

Waaaaay back on September 20, I flew down to New York City to take part in one of the Science Online New York City panel discussions, this one on Enhanced eBooks & BookApps: the Promise and Perils (and here). Ably organized and moderated by David Dobbs, the other panelists were Evan Ratliff, Amanda Moon, Carl…

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