Archives for July, 2013

Change Rhetoric: Good and Bad Three challenges: Engaging, rightscaling and innovating Time for a little dissent To Be Or Not To Be A Library Director How to Answer “So You Need a Degree to Do That?” Putting Things in Perspective Here’s how Amazon self-destructs Amazon vs. your public library Small Pieces Loosely Kludged: Peer Review…

A fun little apocalyptic post from everybody’s favourite humour site, Cracked. Skynet, anyone? 5 Machines That Are Already Learning Humanity’s Weaknesses 5. Slot Machines Slot machines are a diagnostic of everything we still need to fix in the human brain. It’s normal to throw a couple of dollars in to try them out, because paying…

How Technology Is Destroying Jobs The Fall of the American Worker The Internet’s destroying work — and turning the old middle-class into the new proletariat Giving Away Our Lunch Reminders about the Economics of Becoming an Academic Econ 101 is killing America: Forget the dumbed-down garbage most economists spew. Their myths are causing tragic results…

Silencing, librarianship, and gender: a preface Silencing, librarianship, and gender: what is silencing? Gender and Digital Identity Does the library world squash public dissent? Library Schism: How Do Librarians Define Their Profession? The Librarian Shortage Myth & Blaming Library School Waiting for Batgirl The MLS quasar, and Lists for the Perplexed New Services, New Skills,…

I have a son who’s just finished his first year as a physics undergrad. As you can imagine, I occasionally pass along a link or two to him pointing to stuff on the web I think he might find particularly interesting or useful. Thinking on that fact, I surmised that perhaps other science students might…

On May 20th, 2013 I published my most popular post ever. It was The Canadian War on Science: A long, unexaggerated, devastating chronological indictment. In it, I chronicled at some considerable length the various anti-science measures by the current Canadian Conservative government. The chronological aspect was particularly interesting as you could see the ramping up…

There are two kinds of children’s books: those that are aimed primarily at the kids themselves and those that are aimed at the adults that actually shell out the cash to pay for the books. There’s certainly a lot of overlap — books that kids love but that also catch the eyes, hearts & minds…

Harvard’s First University-wide Library Mission Statement Approved by Library Board Declaration for the Right to Libraries Open Review: A Study of Contexts and Practices The Cooler: PLoS ONE and the Panic Over Impact NIH sees surge in open-access manuscripts Academics don’t let themselves be free Guide to Creative Commons Surge in ‘digital dementia’ Library DIY:…

eXTReMe Tracker