academia

Category archives for academia

I always thought Wolfgang Pauli’s famous remark was the ultimate insult to scientists, but apparently I was wrong. Perhaps I was not even wrong given the plethora of scientific insults you can find out there. In any case, many “thanks” to the Knoepfler Lab blog for their descriptive, specialized, perhaps overly ambitious but somewhat derivative…

Welcome to the most recent installment in my very occasional series of interviews with people in the publishing/science blogging/computing communities. The latest is with Peter Binfield and Jason Hoyt of PeerJ. PeerJ is a new startup in the scientific publishing industry, using a rather unique business model whereby authors will be able to pay one…

I’m not one for posting publisher press releases on this blog (and embargoed ones at that!) but sometimes you just have to try something a little different. And this is such an occasion. Below is the press release for a new science publishing startup called PeerJ. It is founded by Peter Binfield, formerly of Public…

Today is #OAMonday. It marks the launch of a petition on the Whitehouse web site to “Require free access over the Internet to scientific journal articles arising from taxpayer-funded research.” Here is the text of the petition: We petition the obama administration to: Require free access over the Internet to scientific journal articles arising from…

I’d like to extend a huge science librarian blogosphere welcome to Information Culture, the newest blog over at Scientific American Blogs! This past Sunday evening I got a cryptic DM from a certain Bora Zivkovic letting me know that I should watch the SciAm blog site first thing Monday morning. I was busy that morning…

Harvard Faculty Advisory Council Memorandum on Journal Pricing: Major Periodical Subscriptions Cannot Be Sustained “No, we can’t” A proposal for the library of the future Harvard: we have a problem Harvard Library: subscriptions too costly, faculty should go open access Could Harvard Library’s “untenable situation” regarding journal costs help move scholars toward open access? Saying…

As I mentioned last week, on Tuesday, April 17 I was part of a workshop on Creative Commons our Scholarly Communications Committee put on for York library staff. My section was on open data and the Panton Principles. While not directly related to Creative Commons, we thought talking a bit about an application area for…

As part of a workshop on Creative Commons, I’m doing a short presentation on Open Data and The Panton Principles this week to various members of our staff. I thought I’d share some of the resources I’ve consulted during my preparations. I’m using textmining of journal articles as a example so I’m including a few…

It’s probably best to start with what Marc J. Kuchner’s new book — Marketing for Scientists: How to Shine in Tough Times — isn’t. It isn’t a social media jackass recipe book for “Success through Twitter.” It isn’t a detailed treatise on marketing theory. It doesn’t come with a guarantee of grants, publications and prizes…

The actual content of the post I’m highlighting isn’t really all that amusing. It’s actually quite pertinent in a real-world context. But I really love how they’ve taken actually useful information that might be a bit dry and businessy and using a Star Wars / pop-cultural reference made it into something a little easier to…

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