book review

Category archives for book review

For those that don’t know, Elizabeth May is the leader of the Green Party of Canada and one of only two Greens in the Canadian Parliament — and the only one elected as a Green. As such, you would expect that she would be a strong advocate for democracy and the environment, willing to stand…

Melissa K. Aho and Erika Bennet’s anthology The Machiavellian Librarian: Winning Allies, Combating Budget Cuts, and influencing Stakeholders is pretty good for what it is, in some ways better than I expected. It’s a guide for maneuvering office politics and advancing your agenda, big and small, with the stakeholders and influencers that matters in your…

This one’s a bit of a head-scratcher. Richard Evan Schwartz’s Really Big Numbers has a great premise. A kids book that takes some fairly advanced mathematical concepts and presents them in a lively, engaging and understandable format. So far, so good. Schwartz does a commendable job of taking the concepts surrounding Really Big Numbers and…

This amusing book, Kanani K. M. Lee and Adam Wallenta’s The Incredible Plate Tectonics Comic: The Adventures of Geo, Vol. 1, is brought to us by the same people as the Survive! Inside the Human Body graphic novel series. As a result it has many of the same strengths but it also suffered from some…

“Even if a small fraction of the Arctic carbon were released to the atmosphere, we’re fucked…We’re on a trajectory to an unmanageable heating scenario, and we need to get off it. We’re fucked at a certain point, right? It just becomes unmanageable. The climate dragon is being poked, and eventually the dragon becomes pissed off…

First Second Books has done it again! They’ve published another wonderful science-themed graphic novel that belongs on every bookshelf. (Of course, they publish tons of other non-science themed graphic novels too. One of my particular favourite recent ones in the biography of Andre the Giant. The Zita the Spacegirl series is also wonderful beyond words.)…

Only rarely in my life as a reviewer do I get books that seem to be absolutely perfectly suited for me. This is certainly the case with Charles L. Adler’s Wizards, Aliens, and Starships: Physics and Math in Fantasy and Science Fiction, a book that combines my love for science and my love for science…

I have some theories about both children’s books and about science-themed graphic works. There are basically two kinds of children’s books: those that are designed to please children versus those that are designed to attract the adults that buy most children’s books. There are also basically two kinds of science-themed graphic works: those that are…

Extremophiles are fun! Basically, they’re the biggest, smallest, hardiest and definitely the oddest bunch of beasties to be found anywhere on this planet. The Palumbi father and son team — one scientist and one writer — bring us this fun little book on the extremophiles of the sea. And literally, the book covers all the…

Two recentish entries into the growing field of graphic novel scientific biographies, both very good, both suitable for a wide audience: Darwin: A Graphic Biography by Eugene Byrne and Simon Gurr and Mind Afire: The Visions of Tesla by Abigail Samoun and Elizabeth Haidle. If I had to count one of these a little bit…

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