book review

Category archives for book review

Donald R. Prothero’s The Story of Life in 25 Fossils: Tales of Intrepid Fossil Hunters and the Wonders of Evolution has a bit of something for everyone. It’s a great introduction to the history of life on the planet Earth, it’s a solid primer on why evolution is true. It’s a fun read with lots…

Kristin Briney’s Data Management for Researchers: Organize, maintain and share your data for research success is a book that should be on the shelf (physical or virtual) of every librarian, researcher and research administrator. Scientists, engineers, social scientists, humanists — anyone who’s work involves generating and keeping track of digital data. This is the book…

John Horton Conway is a great mathematician, certainly one of the greatest living mathematicians. Polymathematical in his mathematical interests (game theory, geometry, group theory, topology and more, not to mention the Game of Life), he’s also one of the most eccentric, and that’s saying a lot in a field where Cedric Villani is prime eccentricity…

This is the first popup book I’ve ever reviewed and I certainly hope it won’t be the last. David Macaulay’s How Machines Work: Zoo Break! is a wonderful, whimsical, delightful and beautiful book that will charm and fascinate anyone who picks it up. Aimed at younger children and told through the eyes of two zoo…

This latest book in my reviewing adventures continues the recentish trend of books concerned with science during World War II. Michael Hiltzik’s Big Science: Ernest Lawrence and the Invention that Launched the Military-Industrial Complex follows books such as Serving the Reich: The Struggle for the Soul of Physics under Hitler, Planck: Driven by Vision, Broken…

Serving the Reich: The Struggle for the Soul of Physics under Hitler by Philip Ball and Planck: Driven by Vision, Broken by War by Brandon R. Brown are two of the best history of science books I’ve read in a very long time. And even though they’re both about World War II, some seventy years…

It’s tempting to go a couple of different ways here. A book that has “Insanely Great” in the title? What could possibly go wrong? On the other hand…. A kids book about what a jerk Steve Jobs was. What could possibly go wrong? Steve Jobs: Insanely Great by Jessie Hartland. An illustrated biography of Steve…

Cédric Villani’s Birth of a Theorem: A Mathematical Adventure has risen to the top of my Best Science Book of 2015 list. It’ll be tough for another book to kick it off that summit before the end of the year, that’s for sure. The name Cédric Villani probably sounds a bit familiar to most who…

Gabriella Coleman’s Hacker, Hoaxer, Whistleblower, Spy: The Many Faces of Anonymous is largely a laudatory history of the Anonymous hacker activist movement with some anthropological and political analysis. Whitney Phillips’ This Is Why We Can’t Have Nice Things: Mapping the Relationship between Online Trolling and Mainstream Culture on the other hand, is much more geared…

Sydney Padua’s The Thrilling Adventures of Lovelace and Babbage is one of the most flat-out entertaining books I have read in a very long time. You should buy this book. Your library should buy this book. Buy a copy of this book for all your friends. What’s all the fuss? TTAoLaB is a graphic novelization…

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