book review

Category archives for book review

Chris Turner’s The War on Science: Muzzled Scientists and Wilful Blindness in Stephen Harper’s Canada (website) is a book that absolutely must be read by every Canadian interested in the future of science and science policy in the country. And the Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s Conservative government is wagering that that’s a pretty low percentage…

Nikola Tesla is a science rockstar. How can you tell? Like any great rockstar, he’s dead. And he has a rock band named after him. He’s wild and colourful. He epitomizes the mad scientist. He was flamboyant and yet strangely ascetic, he was fond of spectacle and showmanship yet also a bit of a hermit.…

It took me a long time to get through The Innovative University: Changing the DNA of Higher Education from the Inside Out, something like eighteen months to finally wade through it. And it’s not that it was even that bad. It a lot of ways, it was better than I expected. Part of it is…

Darrell Bricker and John Ibbitson’s book The Big Shift: The Seismic Change in Canadian Politics, Business, and Culture and What It Means for Our Future is pretty obviously not a science book. Rather, it’s a book about Canadian politics. But of course here in Canada these days, it’s hard to talk about science without talking…

Darryl Cunningham’s How to Fake a Moon Landing: Exposing the Myths of Science Denial is a bit different from most of the graphic novels I’ve reviewed in this space. Most of the earlier books I’ve reviewed have been biographical or historical in nature with the more expository ones at least having some fictional narrative wrapped…

An update on reading and reviewing

I’ve been mostly on vacation for the last little while so I’ve fallen a bit behind on writing the book reviews I feature here on the blog fairly regularly. In fact, there might even be a few books that, ahem, have been sitting around read and unreviewed for perhaps even longer than the last month…

Albert’s Ideas helped build spaceships and satellites that travel to the moon and beyond. His thinking helped us understand our universe as no one ever had before. But still, Albert left us many big questions. Questions that scientists are working on today. Questions that someday you may answer…by wondering, thinking and imagining. So ends the…

There are two kinds of children’s books: those that are aimed primarily at the kids themselves and those that are aimed at the adults that actually shell out the cash to pay for the books. There’s certainly a lot of overlap — books that kids love but that also catch the eyes, hearts & minds…

First Second Books is one of my favourite publishers of graphic novels, in particular because they seem to like to do a lot of science-themed books. Jim Ottaviani’s book Feynman was one of my favourite graphic novels of the last few years. Perhaps not surprisingly, First Second published Feynman. The latest from the science graphic…

Someone shoot me if I ever use the term NP-complete in a sentence. Or at least if I ever use the term in a conversation with “civilians.” Such is the dilemma of reading and reviewing a wonderful book like Lance Fortnow’s The Golden Ticket: P, NP, and the Search for the Impossible. I’ll be tempted…

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