book review

Category archives for book review

Jonathan Fetter-Vorm’s Trinity: A Graphic History of the First Atomic Bomb is a real gem of a graphic novel, yet another stunning exemplar of what is possible with the graphic novel format. As I’ve often said, there are basically two kinds of science graphic novels — those that use the format to illustrate the same…

The Best Science Writing Online 2012 edited by Jennifer Ouellette and Bora Zivkovic is decended from the old Open Laboratory series of anthologies which featured the fifty best science blog posts (and a poem and a cartoon) from the year in question. The series as a whole was organized by Bora Zivkovic and each year…

Ignorance: How It Drives Science by Stuart Firestein is a short book. I wish I could say it was also a sharp shock of a book, but not quite. This is a classic case of a book that cries out to be shorter — in this case from a decent slim hardcover reduced down to…

Reading Diary: Open Access by Peter Suber

Scholars who grew up with the internet are steadily replacing those that grew up without it. Scholars who expect to put everything they write online, who expect to find everything they need online, and who expect unlocked content that they may read, search, link, copy, cut/paste, crawl, print, and redistribute, are replacing those who never…

You know the old saying about the weather — everybody complains but nobody does anything about it! Well, the same can be said about climate change — everybody complains but nobody does anything about it. And that’s partly because of political gridlock, denial and inaction at the highest levels across numerous jurisdictions around the world.…

I feel a little weird reviewing this book. It’s a TED book, you see. What’s a TED book, you ask. I’ll let TED tell you: Shorter than a novel, but longer than an magazine article — a TED Book is a great way to feed your craving for ideas anytime. TED Books are short original…

John MacCormick’s new book, Nine Algorithms That Changed the Future: The Ingenious Ideas That Drive Today’s Computers, is very good. You should buy it and read it. Among all the debates about whether or not absolutely everybody must without question learn to program (pro, con), it’s perhaps a good idea to pause and take a…

It’s probably best to start with what Marc J. Kuchner’s new book — Marketing for Scientists: How to Shine in Tough Times — isn’t. It isn’t a social media jackass recipe book for “Success through Twitter.” It isn’t a detailed treatise on marketing theory. It doesn’t come with a guarantee of grants, publications and prizes…

Walter Isaacson’s book on Apple founder & CEO Steve Jobs is a fairly long book. It’s not exactly a thriller either, especially since I know how it ends. As a result it took me a while to plow through it. I tended to read it in bursts of 40 or 50 pages over a few…

A year of books: 2011

I’m including here a list of all the books I’ve read in 2011, as well as some commentary on my particular year in reading. I always enjoy when people post these sorts of lists online and actually rather enjoy doing so myself. I’ve been doing this for a few years now: 2010, 2009, 2008 and…

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