Canada

Category archives for Canada

One of the highlights of the year for me is the Lane Anderson Award shortlist announcement. From their website here and here: The Lane Anderson designation honours the maiden names of Robert Fitzhenry’s mother, Margaret Lane, and his wife, Hilda Anderson Fitzhenry. The Fitzhenry Family Foundation is a privately directed Canadian foundation established in 1987…

There are two very strong competing emotions at work here in this post: delight versus depression. Depression that the government-funded research landscape here in Canada can sink so low that the premier freshwater research facility likely in the world is reduced to putting its hand out and asking for spare change just to fund its…

As part of the celebrations for Canada’s upcomming 150th birthday, the Canadian federal government has released its Digital Canada 150 strategy paper, and while it`s not all bad, at the same time there is not an awful lot to recommend it. Especially considering it was four years in the making. My sense is that its…

Added: Please note the date this post was published on. After a couple of years of implementing some really amazing and progressive change at Elsevier, I’ve decided to refocus some of my advisory efforts over the next few years. As a result, I’ll be taking on a senior advisory role for the Government of Canada.…

York University mathematician and civil rights activist Lee Lorch died February 28, 2014 at the age of 98. A few years ago I posted on the 2007 Joint Mathematics Meetings in New Orleans Lee Lorch where Lee was awarded the Yueh-Gin Gung and Charles Y. Hu Award for Distinguished Service to Mathematics. The citation read:…

I’ll be at Science Online Together for the next few days. I missed last year so I’m really looking forward to getting back into the Science Online swing of things. As is occasionally my habit, I’ll be listing here some attendees that are either Canadian, librarians or, in a few select cases, both. I’m adding…

Welcome to the rebooted science interview series here at Confessions of a Science Librarian! The previous incarnation mostly concentrated on people in the broadly defined scholarly communications community, like Mark Patterson of eLife, Peter Binfield and Jason Hoyt of PeerJ or author Michael Nielsen. The series has been extremely irregular for the last few years…

A couple of weeks ago I was approached by Rabble.ca to write a piece for them with some of my thoughts about the current controversy surrounding the government of Canada’s closure of several Department of Fisheries and Oceans libraries. I have a link compilation here. I was happy to write up something and it appeared…

Looking over all the books I read in 2013, there’s one non-fiction book that really stands out as the best. Former astronaut Chris Hadfield’s memoir An Astronaut’s Guide to Life on Earth. wasn’t the deepest or most information-packed book I read last year, but it was the most entertaining and involving. And it’s core message…

I have an article up at Rabble.ca today about the library closure situation at Canada’s Department of Fisheries and Oceans. When closures happen, the librarians and staff work very hard to minimize the impact on their community, especially to make sure valuable collections are not lost and that research support services are maintained. This is…

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