Canadian war on science

Category archives for Canadian war on science

Katie Gibbs and Alana Westwood of Evidence for Democracy wrote a terrific piece in The Toronto Star a little while ago, We need a national debate on science: A question about science policy has never been asked at a federal leaders’ debate. Now more than ever that has to change. Given the clear importance of…

It has begun. Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper has called an election for October 19, 2015, kicking off a marathon 11 week election campaign. The longest campaign since the 1870s, believe it or not. My patient readers may have noticed that over the last few years I’ve posted quite a bit about how science has…

In the Late Harper period of Canadian politics it’s getting harder and harder to tell the difference between satire and legitimate news stories. Here’s a couple of examples of satire followed by one that’s even scarier and more disturbing because it’s an actual news story. We live in interesting times. Fortunately there’s a election coming…

This roundup includes reviews of a bunch of recent and not-so-recent reading about Canadian politics, in particular the Harper government and how it controls information. Some of the books are pretty directly related to science policy and some, not so much. These are all worth reading, some kind of overlap while others present fairly unique…

We live in a k-cup culture. Focused on the near term but willfully blind to the longer term implications of our daily decisions. Just before the holidays I was watching the CBC TV show Power and Politics and they were discussing a bunch of “Top 5s” in an end-of year story. You know the type,…

As I mentioned last week, I did a presentation at the recent Ontario Library Association Super Conference using my work on Canadian science policy as a case study in altmetrics. Here’s the session description: 802F Altmetrics in Action: Documenting Cuts to Federal Government Science: An Altmetrics Case Study The gold standard for measuring scholarly impact…

The default mode, politically-speaking, for most scientists seems to be professionally neutral. In other words, most scientists would tend to see their personal political beliefs as more or less completely separate from their work as scientists. Even for politically sensitive topics like climate change, the tendency is to focus on the the best available evidence…

On May 20th, 2013 I published my most popular post ever. It was The Canadian War on Science: A long, unexaggerated, devastating chronological indictment. In it, I chronicled at some considerable length the various anti-science measures by the current Canadian Conservative government. The chronological aspect was particularly interesting as you could see the ramping up…

Think of this as a combination 2014 recap and 2015 resolutions post. Neither of which I really planned to do after doing recaps for the last couple of years. Two years ago, 2013, was very clearly a year I was more obsessed than usual with advocacy around the current Canadian government’s treatment of science and…

For those that don’t know, Elizabeth May is the leader of the Green Party of Canada and one of only two Greens in the Canadian Parliament — and the only one elected as a Green. As such, you would expect that she would be a strong advocate for democracy and the environment, willing to stand…

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