computer science

Category archives for computer science

A nice post from computer scientist Amy Csizmar Dalal on Five things that helped me survive summer: 5. Interlibrary loan and ebooks (tie). I am almost certain that I have checked more out of the library through interlibrary loan this summer than I have in my previous 7 years at Carleton combined. And this summer,…

Review of: Makers by Cory Doctorow

I actually read the freely downloadable version of Cory Doctorow’s novel Makers on my Kobo ereader, even though I did buy the hardcover when it came out last year. Mostly, I wanted to check out the experience of reading a long text on my reader. Overall, the Kobo reading experience was terrific, not much different…

Now that’s an attention-getter! It comes from Ted Chiang‘s Big Idea post on John Scalzi’s blog Whatever. It’s a promotional piece for Chiang’s latest book, The Lifecycle of Software Objects, which is about artificial intelligence. For those of you that haven’t heard of him, Chiang is one of the real breakout science fiction writers of…

Eugene Wallingford of the blog Knowing and Doing was at the SIGCSE Computer Science Education conference this past spring and as usual he provides a very fine report over a number of posts. SIGCSE DAY 0 — Media Computation Workshop I headed to SIGCSE a day early this year in order to participate in a…

Frederik Pohl on Alan Turing

Following up on my post from a few days ago, a short appreciation of Alan Turing by noted sf author Frederik Pohl: The close of Pride Month seems an apt time to talk about Alan Turing, inventor of the famed Turing Test for identifying independent intelligence in computers, worked for the British code breakers in…

Stephen Wolfram on Alan Turing

Nice post by Stephen Wolfram on the Wolfram|Alpha blog, Happy Birthday, Alan Turing: He was in some respects a quintessential British amateur, dipping his intellect into different areas. He achieved a high level of competence in pure mathematics, and used that as his professional base. His contributions in traditional mathematics were certainly perfectly respectable, though…

A great two-part series on great computing museums from the last few issues of Communications of the ACM (here and here). The museums they profile are: The Computer History Museum The Heinz Nixdorf MuseumsForum The Science Museum in London The Deutches Museum U.S. National Museum of American History I’ll include an extra bit from the…

A small selection from some tables of content from a few recent journals and proceedings. These will require subscription access to the ACM Digital Library. Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education Connecting k-16 curriculum & policy: making computer science engaging, accessible, and hospitable for underrepresented students by Joanna Goode Computational thinking for the sciences: a…

That’s the topic for the most recent Schubmehl-Prein Prize for Best Essay on Social Impact of Computing. The Schubmehl-Prein Prize for best analysis of the social impact of a particular aspect of computing technology will be awarded to a student who is a high school junior in academic year 2009-2010. The first-place award is $1,000,…

Is computer science baseless?

From the April Communications of the ACM, the Kode Vicious column is on The Data-Structure Canon. The reader question is: In most areas of science there are a few basic underlying laws that inform the rest of the study of a given subject. Physics, chemistry, and electrical engineering all have these basic equations. What are…

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