culture of science

Category archives for culture of science

Main event. Definitely. Elsevier’s acquisition of the open access journal article and working papers repository and online community Social Science Research Network (SSRN) is definitely a case of Elsevier tipping their hand and giving us all a peek at their real long term strategy. Much more so than their whack-a-mole antics with Sci-Hub and other…

I have a son who’s currently a fourth year physics undergrad who is headed more the direction of math rather than physics for the possibility of grad school. As you can imagine, I may occasionally pass along a link or two to him pointing to stuff on the web I think they might find particularly…

Reader Beware: Please note the date of publication of this post. It’s been really gratifying over the last year to see how my DSCaM scholarly communications empire has grown. From it’s small beginnings, Dupuis Science Computing & Medicine has craved out a small but important niche in the discount APC publishing community. And I really…

The controversy about Sci-Hub is raging in the halls of scholarship and academic publishing. What’s the story, in a nutshell? Sci-Hub is a Russian website that has used donated institutional login credentials to harvest tens of millions of academic articles and has posted them on their site, free to access and read for everyone. This…

Oh, The Onion. You are so wonderful and your take on the world of patents is so spot on that it hurts. What are patents for, anyways? Here’s a bit of an excerpt from their 11 Step Program. Drop by the site to see the rest. Brilliant. Step 1: First, come up with something really…

A couple of weeks ago I gave a presentation as part of Open Access Week at the Ontario College of Art and Design University (ie. OCADU) on “predatory” open access journals. It seemed to be well-received at the time and since then I’ve gotten some positive feedback as well. So I thought I’d share the…

My library is hosting a Ada Lovelace Day event tomorrow (ok, a little late…). Continuing in a tradition of having Women in Science Wikipedia Edit-a-thons, we’re hosting our own Wikipedia Women in Science Edit-a-thon! I’ve been doing a fair bit of reading over the last couple of years about Wikipedia culture and especially how it…

Serving the Reich: The Struggle for the Soul of Physics under Hitler by Philip Ball and Planck: Driven by Vision, Broken by War by Brandon R. Brown are two of the best history of science books I’ve read in a very long time. And even though they’re both about World War II, some seventy years…

Though not explicitly tied to our current federal election campaign, the début this week of the Science Integrity Project and the publishing of their Statement of Principles for Sound Decision Making in Canada just as the campaign heats up is surely not coincidental. In any case, election or not, this is a wonderful initiative and…

Science! What’s it good for? Working towards better knowledge about the natural world! Under review today are two books that approach what science is and what it’s good for from very different angles. Steven Weinberg is a Nobel laureate in physics and in his book To Explain the World: The Discovery of Modern Science he…

eXTReMe Tracker