culture of science

Category archives for culture of science

Finally, the Canadian government’s Tri-Agency funding councils (SSHRC, NSERC, CIHR) have released the consolidated final version of it’s open access policy. The draft version came out some time ago. The consultation process garnered quite a few responses, which the Tri-Agencies were kind enough to summarize for us. And finally it is here. I have to…

Why Science Journal Paywalls Have to Go Authors or journal editors: Who faces more pressure in the academic publishing system? STM Consultation on Article Sharing (Draft principles here) ICOLC Response to the International Association of Scientific Technical and Medical (STM) Statement A second front STM’s new publishing licenses raise antitrust concerns amid wider efforts to…

As I mentioned last week, I did a presentation at the recent Ontario Library Association Super Conference using my work on Canadian science policy as a case study in altmetrics. Here’s the session description: 802F Altmetrics in Action: Documenting Cuts to Federal Government Science: An Altmetrics Case Study The gold standard for measuring scholarly impact…

The default mode, politically-speaking, for most scientists seems to be professionally neutral. In other words, most scientists would tend to see their personal political beliefs as more or less completely separate from their work as scientists. Even for politically sensitive topics like climate change, the tendency is to focus on the the best available evidence…

On May 20th, 2013 I published my most popular post ever. It was The Canadian War on Science: A long, unexaggerated, devastating chronological indictment. In it, I chronicled at some considerable length the various anti-science measures by the current Canadian Conservative government. The chronological aspect was particularly interesting as you could see the ramping up…

I’m doing a presentation at this week’s Ontario Library Association Super Conference on a case study of my Canadian War on Science work from an altmetrics perspective. In other words, looking at non-traditional ways of evaluating the scholarly and “real world” impact of a piece of research. Of course, in this case, the research output…

Around the Web: Science Policy!

Science Advice: Cultivating the necessary functions in Canada A rough guide to science advice Principles and politics of scientific advice What do policymakers want from academics? Tips for Academics Who Want to Engage Policymakers Top 20 things scientists need to know about policy-making Top 20 things politicians need to know about science 12 things policy-makers…

Yes, it has become a trilogy. The two Twitter rants I recapped here sparked more angst and anguish in me, prompting me to write a third rant. As it became ready for Twitter publication and approached 800 words, it also became clear that this particular rant was fast outgrowing what I could reasonably expect people…

Twitter is a great place to rant and rave sometimes. You can feel free to let loose and say what you’re thinking without necessarily feeling that you need to have completely well-formed ideas. The enforced brevity can sometimes also be a plus, as it forces you to distill what you want to say to the…

To continue the recent American Association for the Advancement of Science theme, I present the text of a recent open letter I signed to the AAAS concerning their new journal Science Advances. Thanks to Jonathan Tennant for spearheading this effort. You can read more about the rationale behind writing the letter and the process involved…

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