culture of science

Category archives for culture of science

(This post supersedes the previous post listing items related to the Aaron Swartz story. That post was from January 20, 2013.) A few comments. Aaron Swartz’s story has had a huge impact, it has reverberated far and wide not just through the interlinking worlds of technology and online activism but far into the mainstream. The…

Cracked is as Cracked does. Especially in this case, where some researchers do some especially cracked things. Or more precisely, things they only could have thought of after being cracked on the head. Librarian researchers, don’t try this at your library! The 5 Most Badass Things Ever Done in the Name of Research 5. Thor…

The biennial Western Conference on Science Education will be taking place this coming July 9–July 11, 2013. I’m thinking very seriously of going and I think science/engineering librarians in general should consider doing so as well. Here’s how they describe it: The biennial Western Conference for Science Education creates an ongoing organizational infrastructure that invites…

Jonathan Fetter-Vorm’s Trinity: A Graphic History of the First Atomic Bomb is a real gem of a graphic novel, yet another stunning exemplar of what is possible with the graphic novel format. As I’ve often said, there are basically two kinds of science graphic novels — those that use the format to illustrate the same…

The recent death of Aaron Swartz has provoked a lot of commentary on the web so I thought I would gather some of it here. This is by no means an attempt to be comprehensive as the amount of commentary has been truly vast. I’ve tried to gather enough so that someone working through even…

On January 10, 2013 Rick Anderson published a post at The Scholarly Kitchen published on six mistakes library staff are making when dealing with our vendors. Most of them were fairly standard stuff like don’t be rude, don’t waste people’s time. That sort of thing. (Yes, sometimes I think that every time I link to…

A year in Open Access advocacy: 2012

While it has not generally been my practice to do year end review posts, artificially trying to tie the various and disparate strands of my blogging habits together into some sort of coherent story, I think for this year it’s worth doing. And that’s because my blogging year did seem to have a coherent theme…

Ignorance: How It Drives Science by Stuart Firestein is a short book. I wish I could say it was also a sharp shock of a book, but not quite. This is a classic case of a book that cries out to be shorter — in this case from a decent slim hardcover reduced down to…

As I mentioned way back on October 22nd, I was kindly invited to give a talk at the Brock University Physics Department as part of their seminar series. The talk was on Getting Your Science Online, a topic that I’m somewhat familiar with! Since it was coincidentally Open Access Week, I did kind of an…

Why do people go into science? Why do people go to work at scholarly societies? Why do people choose scholarly publishing as a career? Why do people choose a career at the intersection of those three vocations? There are cynical answers to those questions, for sure, and even the non-cynical need to put food on…

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