culture of science

Category archives for culture of science

Reading Diary: Open Access by Peter Suber

Scholars who grew up with the internet are steadily replacing those that grew up without it. Scholars who expect to put everything they write online, who expect to find everything they need online, and who expect unlocked content that they may read, search, link, copy, cut/paste, crawl, print, and redistribute, are replacing those who never…

Jenica Rogers is Director of Libraries at the State University of New York at Potsdam. Like so many institutions SUNY Potsdam subscribes to the suite of journals published by the American Chemical Society. Now, that’s always a challenge since the ACS prices their products very aggressively as well as pushing the envelope with annual price…

Whither Science Publishing?

About a month ago The Scientist published an interesting set of interviews with a set of scientists, publishers and LIS faculty on the future of scholarly publishing. They called it Whither Science Publishing? with the subtitle “As we stand on the brink of a new scientific age, how researchers should best communicate their findings and…

An Open Access thought experiment

Imagine a scenario where suddenly over night all toll access publishing suddenly converts to Open Access. You go to bed and your average academic library spends millions of dollars on serials. You wake up, and the subscription bill is zero. Now, that doesn’t mean that suddenly scholarly publishing doesn’t cost anything to support. It just…

My colleagues and I are taking our Creative Commons/Panton Principles presentation on the road to another library conference this winter. As a result, I’m still compiling more references on the topic so I thought I share what I’ve found recently with all of you. Of course, suggestions for more resources are always welcome in the…

I’m on my annual summer hiatus for the month of July so I’ll be only publishing my weekly Friday Fun posts as well as re-posting some of the interviews I did a few years ago on the old blog with people from the publishing, library and science worlds. Not that my posting of late has…

The title of this post might be a bit misleading. I don’t really think it’s much of a question. Of course it’s ok to get paid to promote open access. My university pays me to be a librarian. I have faculty status. I can decide what I think are the most important issues in my…

Welcome to the most recent installment in my very occasional series of interviews with people in the publishing/science blogging/computing communities. The latest is with Peter Binfield and Jason Hoyt of PeerJ. PeerJ is a new startup in the scientific publishing industry, using a rather unique business model whereby authors will be able to pay one…

I’m not one for posting publisher press releases on this blog (and embargoed ones at that!) but sometimes you just have to try something a little different. And this is such an occasion. Below is the press release for a new science publishing startup called PeerJ. It is founded by Peter Binfield, formerly of Public…

Today is #OAMonday. It marks the launch of a petition on the Whitehouse web site to “Require free access over the Internet to scientific journal articles arising from taxpayer-funded research.” Here is the text of the petition: We petition the obama administration to: Require free access over the Internet to scientific journal articles arising from…

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