culture of science

Category archives for culture of science

A year in Open Access advocacy: 2012

While it has not generally been my practice to do year end review posts, artificially trying to tie the various and disparate strands of my blogging habits together into some sort of coherent story, I think for this year it’s worth doing. And that’s because my blogging year did seem to have a coherent theme…

Ignorance: How It Drives Science by Stuart Firestein is a short book. I wish I could say it was also a sharp shock of a book, but not quite. This is a classic case of a book that cries out to be shorter — in this case from a decent slim hardcover reduced down to…

As I mentioned way back on October 22nd, I was kindly invited to give a talk at the Brock University Physics Department as part of their seminar series. The talk was on Getting Your Science Online, a topic that I’m somewhat familiar with! Since it was coincidentally Open Access Week, I did kind of an…

Why do people go into science? Why do people go to work at scholarly societies? Why do people choose scholarly publishing as a career? Why do people choose a career at the intersection of those three vocations? There are cynical answers to those questions, for sure, and even the non-cynical need to put food on…

The current Conservative government of Canada isn’t too fond of Canadians having access to information. It’s inconvenient for them because I guess a well-informed citizenry would be more likely to call them on the various shenanigans they’ve been indulging in. A good general take on the situation is Allan Gregg’s recent speech, 1984 in 2012…

Reading Diary: Open Access by Peter Suber

Scholars who grew up with the internet are steadily replacing those that grew up without it. Scholars who expect to put everything they write online, who expect to find everything they need online, and who expect unlocked content that they may read, search, link, copy, cut/paste, crawl, print, and redistribute, are replacing those who never…

Jenica Rogers is Director of Libraries at the State University of New York at Potsdam. Like so many institutions SUNY Potsdam subscribes to the suite of journals published by the American Chemical Society. Now, that’s always a challenge since the ACS prices their products very aggressively as well as pushing the envelope with annual price…

Whither Science Publishing?

About a month ago The Scientist published an interesting set of interviews with a set of scientists, publishers and LIS faculty on the future of scholarly publishing. They called it Whither Science Publishing? with the subtitle “As we stand on the brink of a new scientific age, how researchers should best communicate their findings and…

An Open Access thought experiment

Imagine a scenario where suddenly over night all toll access publishing suddenly converts to Open Access. You go to bed and your average academic library spends millions of dollars on serials. You wake up, and the subscription bill is zero. Now, that doesn’t mean that suddenly scholarly publishing doesn’t cost anything to support. It just…

My colleagues and I are taking our Creative Commons/Panton Principles presentation on the road to another library conference this winter. As a result, I’m still compiling more references on the topic so I thought I share what I’ve found recently with all of you. Of course, suggestions for more resources are always welcome in the…

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