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Some capsule reviews of books I’ve finished over the last little while, in the spirit of catching up. van Grouw, Katrina. The Unfeathered Bird. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2013. 304pp. ISBN-13: 978-0691151342 This is a seriously beautiful coffee table-sized scientific illustrations book on birds. Basically the idea of the book is to explore birds through…

Jonathan Fetter-Vorm’s Trinity: A Graphic History of the First Atomic Bomb is a real gem of a graphic novel, yet another stunning exemplar of what is possible with the graphic novel format. As I’ve often said, there are basically two kinds of science graphic novels — those that use the format to illustrate the same…

I have a whole pile of science-y book reviews on two of my older blogs, here and here. Both of those blogs have now been largely superseded by or merged into this one. So I’m going to be slowly moving the relevant reviews over here. I’ll mostly be doing the posts one or two per…

I have a whole pile of science-y book reviews on two of my older blogs, here and here. Both of those blogs have now been largely superseded by or merged into this one. So I’m going to be slowly moving the relevant reviews over here. I’ll mostly be doing the posts one or two per…

I have a whole pile of science-y book reviews on two of my older blogs, here and here. Both of those blogs have now been largely superseded by or merged into this one. So I’m going to be slowly moving the relevant reviews over here. I’ll mostly be doing the posts one or two per…

A couple more shorts lists. HistoryNet Rival Rails: The Race to Build America’s Greatest Transcontinental Railroad by Walter Borneman DC-3: A Legend In Her Time-A 75th Anniversary Photographic Tribute by Bruce McAllister Air Power: The Men, Machines, and Ideas that Revolutionized War, from Kitty Hawk to Iraq By Stephen Budiansky O Magazine The Immortal Life…

Ah, The Onion. I haven’t used them in a while for my Friday Fun and it was feeling like it was way overdue. As usual, classic stuff: Historians Admit To Inventing Ancient Greeks: A group of leading historians held a press conference Monday at the National Geographic Society to announce they had “entirely fabricated” ancient…

Some interesting articles, as usual, in the latest issue: External Characteristics of Computer Operations: Toward Large Conversational Time-Sharing Systems by Wiehle, Hans Rudiger First Edition Unix: Its Creation and Restoration by Toomey, Warren The Network Information Center and its Archives by Feinler, Elizabeth Promoting the Prosaic: The Case for Process-Control Computers by Aylen, Jonathan There…

I love Wikipedia. I probably use it every day. It’s become an indispensable part of the modern information landscape. But. A few months ago, I was doing a session in our lab with a bunch of high school students. When I do these sessions I try and illuminate how the modern information landscape is a…

Stephen Wolfram on Alan Turing

Nice post by Stephen Wolfram on the Wolfram|Alpha blog, Happy Birthday, Alan Turing: He was in some respects a quintessential British amateur, dipping his intellect into different areas. He achieved a high level of competence in pure mathematics, and used that as his professional base. His contributions in traditional mathematics were certainly perfectly respectable, though…

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