open access

Category archives for open access

(This post supersedes the previous post listing items related to the Aaron Swartz story. That post was from January 20, 2013.) A few comments. Aaron Swartz’s story has had a huge impact, it has reverberated far and wide not just through the interlinking worlds of technology and online activism but far into the mainstream. The…

Expanding Public Access to the Results of Federally Funded Research Increasing Public Access to the Results of Scientific Research Second shoe drops: new White House Directive mandates OA AAP Supports OSTP Policy Urging Collaboration in Public Access White House Public Access Policy Is Out White House Delivers New Open-Access Policy That Has Activists Cheering SPARC…

Like lunch, writing isn’t free when librarians lend their politics – or, information wants to be doctrinaire OLITA Resolution on Opposition to Access Copyright License Agreements Calling out nonsense – Access Copyright On (Access) Copyright What is the government’s interest in copyright? Not that of the public. The Fastest Way to Send Big Chunks of…

I’m doing a session at the Ontario Library Conference tomorrow with a few colleagues. The topic is Creative Commons licensing and I’m doing the section on Open Data. It’s a kind of a replay of what we did for library staff about a year ago. Here’s the info this time: Session: #308 Thursday 9:05 AM…

The recent death of Aaron Swartz has provoked a lot of commentary on the web so I thought I would gather some of it here. This is by no means an attempt to be comprehensive as the amount of commentary has been truly vast. I’ve tried to gather enough so that someone working through even…

On January 10, 2013 Rick Anderson published a post at The Scholarly Kitchen published on six mistakes library staff are making when dealing with our vendors. Most of them were fairly standard stuff like don’t be rude, don’t waste people’s time. That sort of thing. (Yes, sometimes I think that every time I link to…

A year in Open Access advocacy: 2012

While it has not generally been my practice to do year end review posts, artificially trying to tie the various and disparate strands of my blogging habits together into some sort of coherent story, I think for this year it’s worth doing. And that’s because my blogging year did seem to have a coherent theme…

OA and the UK Humanities & Social Sciences: Wrong risks and missed opportunities One Size Fits All?: Social Science and Open Access Statement on position in relation to open access(Institute of Historical Research) The open access journal as a disruptive innovation Openness, value, and scholarly societies: The Modern Language Association model Public Library of Humanities:…

Like the old saying goes, information wants to be free. In particular, the consumers of information would prefer for the most part not to have to directly pay for the information they are consuming. The information itself, if I may anthropomorphize for a moment, also wants to circulate as freely as possible, to be as…

The most recent controversy to whip up the library and science blogospheres revolves around SUNY Potsdam cancelling their American Chemical Society journal package because the subscription packages on offer sucked up too high a percentage of their total budget. SUNY Potsdam Library Director Jenica Rogers wrote about the decision on her blog, garnering quite a…

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