Politics

Category archives for Politics

A couple of weeks ago I was approached by Rabble.ca to write a piece for them with some of my thoughts about the current controversy surrounding the government of Canada’s closure of several Department of Fisheries and Oceans libraries. I have a link compilation here. I was happy to write up something and it appeared…

I have an article up at Rabble.ca today about the library closure situation at Canada’s Department of Fisheries and Oceans. When closures happen, the librarians and staff work very hard to minimize the impact on their community, especially to make sure valuable collections are not lost and that research support services are maintained. This is…

Welcome to the rebooted science interview series here at Confessions of a Science Librarian! The previous incarnation mostly concentrated on people in the broadly defined scholarly communications community, like Mark Patterson of eLife, Peter Binfield and Jason Hoyt of PeerJ or author Michael Nielsen. The series has been extremely irregular for the last few years…

As is occasionally my habit when a big story breaks, I have gathered together all the relevant documents I could find concerning the recent controversy about the Canadian Conservative government’s recent consolidation of the libraries at their Department of Fisheries & Oceans. The consolidation has resulted in severely weeded collections, library closures and staff layoffs.…

Welcome to the rebooted science interview series here at Confessions of a Science Librarian! The previous incarnation mostly concentrated on people in the broadly defined scholarly communications community, like Mark Patterson of eLife, Peter Binfield and Jason Hoyt of PeerJ or author Michael Nielsen. The series has been extremely irregular for the last few years…

2012 was a year of Open Access advocacy for me. I published a ton of posts that year generally around the loose theme of making the scholarly communications ecosystem fairer and more open. In 2013 I did a little of that too, for sure. But with a lot of the effects of the Conservative government’s…

Welcome to the rebooted science interview series here at Confessions of a Science Librarian! The previous incarnation mostly concentrated on people in the broadly definined scholarly communications community, like Mark Patterson of eLife, Peter Binfield and Jason Hoyt of PeerJ or author Michael Nielsen. The series has been lying fairly fallow for the last few…

Sarah Boon (Twitter, blog) has organized a series of posts on science policy in Canada over the next month or so to be published in the iPolitics online magazine. The first four are out with another eight (two approximately every Monday) between now and November 18th. Which is just in time for the upcoming Canadian…

Chris Turner’s The War on Science: Muzzled Scientists and Wilful Blindness in Stephen Harper’s Canada (website) is a book that absolutely must be read by every Canadian interested in the future of science and science policy in the country. And the Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s Conservative government is wagering that that’s a pretty low percentage…

How bad is it? Even the New York Times has noticed what is going on with Canadian science, comparing the situation here unfavourably with the situation in the US under George W. Bush. It began badly enough in 2008 when scientists working for Environment Canada, the federal agency, were told to refer all queries to…

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