reading diary

Category archives for reading diary

Gabriella Coleman’s Hacker, Hoaxer, Whistleblower, Spy: The Many Faces of Anonymous is largely a laudatory history of the Anonymous hacker activist movement with some anthropological and political analysis. Whitney Phillips’ This Is Why We Can’t Have Nice Things: Mapping the Relationship between Online Trolling and Mainstream Culture on the other hand, is much more geared…

Sydney Padua’s The Thrilling Adventures of Lovelace and Babbage is one of the most flat-out entertaining books I have read in a very long time. You should buy this book. Your library should buy this book. Buy a copy of this book for all your friends. What’s all the fuss? TTAoLaB is a graphic novelization…

I am not trying to deny the transformative nature of the Internet, but rather that we’ve lived with it long enough to ask tough questions. … I’ve tried to avoid the Manichean view of technology, which assumes either that the Internet will save us or that it is leading us astray, that it is making…

A bit unusually for me, I’m reviewing a novel as part of my Reading Diary series. Usually the closest I’ll get to a novel is a fictionalized science graphic novel of some sort, kind of like the Survive! series or Lauren Ispsum. But no, this ain’t one of those. It’s a good old fashioned novel.…

What is digital governance in the first place? Digital governance is a discipline that focuses on establishing clear accountability for digital strategy, policy, and standards. A digital governance framework, when effectively designed and implemented, helps to streamline digital development and dampen debates around digital channel “ownership.” — From the Managing Chaos: Digital Governance by Design…

This roundup includes reviews of a bunch of recent and not-so-recent reading about Canadian politics, in particular the Harper government and how it controls information. Some of the books are pretty directly related to science policy and some, not so much. These are all worth reading, some kind of overlap while others present fairly unique…

There’s kind of two theories of the web. The first theory is that it’s the best thing ever, the culmination of human civilization, incapable of being anything negative in anyone’s lives. Proponents of this theory can’t stand it when anyone says anything mean about the web (or usually any technology) in public or especially online.…

Colin Adams’s Zombies & Calculus is one of the coolest, funniest, most creative science books I’ve read in a very long time. What’s interesting about that statement is that we’re not talking a non-fiction book here. We’re talking a novel. Yes, a novel. Zombies & Calculus is pure fiction. Fortunately. Now I’m a big fan…

Imagine a world where two guys, graduates of the University of Guelph, a mid-sized university in southern Ontario, are able to parlay a series of funny and cool whiteboard-style science explanation YouTube videos into a global science communication empire. Without even “forgetting” to give credit to science illustrators in the process. Don’t imagine too hard,…

For those that don’t know, Elizabeth May is the leader of the Green Party of Canada and one of only two Greens in the Canadian Parliament — and the only one elected as a Green. As such, you would expect that she would be a strong advocate for democracy and the environment, willing to stand…

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