scholarly publishing

Category archives for scholarly publishing

Welcome to the most recent installment in my very occasional series of interviews with people in the publishing/science blogging/computing communities. This latest installment is with Mark Patterson, Executive Director of new OA publisher eLife. I attended an ARL Directors briefing conference call on eLife with Mark a little while back, highlighting for me just how…

The Journal of Library Administration is published by Taylor & Francis, a big publishing conglomerate. According to Brian Mathews, while he was in the middle of putting together a special issue on the future of libraries he received notice that the editorial board was resigning due to conflicts with the publisher around what kind of…

Just like the author of this piece, I too attended a recent talk by Cory Doctorow — a brilliant talk relating the life and death of Aaron Swartz with the theme of his latest novel Homeland — and similarly I often marvel at how lucky we are that the web is free and open. Enjoy…

(This post supersedes the previous post listing items related to the Aaron Swartz story. That post was from January 20, 2013.) A few comments. Aaron Swartz’s story has had a huge impact, it has reverberated far and wide not just through the interlinking worlds of technology and online activism but far into the mainstream. The…

So here’s the rather strange story. Way back in 2010, librarian Dale Askey, then of Kansas State University, wrote a blog post critical of the humanities monograph publisher Edwin Mellen. Basically, he stated that the publishers’ low quality did not justify their high prices. No big deal, really, librarians have lots of opinions about publishers…

I’m doing a session at the Ontario Library Conference tomorrow with a few colleagues. The topic is Creative Commons licensing and I’m doing the section on Open Data. It’s a kind of a replay of what we did for library staff about a year ago. Here’s the info this time: Session: #308 Thursday 9:05 AM…

The recent death of Aaron Swartz has provoked a lot of commentary on the web so I thought I would gather some of it here. This is by no means an attempt to be comprehensive as the amount of commentary has been truly vast. I’ve tried to gather enough so that someone working through even…

On January 10, 2013 Rick Anderson published a post at The Scholarly Kitchen published on six mistakes library staff are making when dealing with our vendors. Most of them were fairly standard stuff like don’t be rude, don’t waste people’s time. That sort of thing. (Yes, sometimes I think that every time I link to…

A year in Open Access advocacy: 2012

While it has not generally been my practice to do year end review posts, artificially trying to tie the various and disparate strands of my blogging habits together into some sort of coherent story, I think for this year it’s worth doing. And that’s because my blogging year did seem to have a coherent theme…

Yes, the science blogging community has certainly seen some gyrations in the last few years with a bunch of new networks sprouting up, sometimes from the ashes of other networks, sometimes completely on their own. The latest is Phenomena: A science salon hosted by National Geographic magazine. Phenomena is a gathering of spirited science writers…

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