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Kristin Briney’s Data Management for Researchers: Organize, maintain and share your data for research success is a book that should be on the shelf (physical or virtual) of every librarian, researcher and research administrator. Scientists, engineers, social scientists, humanists — anyone who’s work involves generating and keeping track of digital data. This is the book…

This is the first popup book I’ve ever reviewed and I certainly hope it won’t be the last. David Macaulay’s How Machines Work: Zoo Break! is a wonderful, whimsical, delightful and beautiful book that will charm and fascinate anyone who picks it up. Aimed at younger children and told through the eyes of two zoo…

This latest book in my reviewing adventures continues the recentish trend of books concerned with science during World War II. Michael Hiltzik’s Big Science: Ernest Lawrence and the Invention that Launched the Military-Industrial Complex follows books such as Serving the Reich: The Struggle for the Soul of Physics under Hitler, Planck: Driven by Vision, Broken…

My library is hosting a Ada Lovelace Day event tomorrow (ok, a little late…). Continuing in a tradition of having Women in Science Wikipedia Edit-a-thons, we’re hosting our own Wikipedia Women in Science Edit-a-thon! I’ve been doing a fair bit of reading over the last couple of years about Wikipedia culture and especially how it…

As you can all imagine, I’m quite pleased to see the backside of the Harper government on their way out the door. Of course, the Liberals have promised a lot but only time will tell how serious they are about fixing the science-related stuff that they’ve promised to fix. I’ll definitely be watching that and…

Serving the Reich: The Struggle for the Soul of Physics under Hitler by Philip Ball and Planck: Driven by Vision, Broken by War by Brandon R. Brown are two of the best history of science books I’ve read in a very long time. And even though they’re both about World War II, some seventy years…

Though not explicitly tied to our current federal election campaign, the d├ębut this week of the Science Integrity Project and the publishing of their Statement of Principles for Sound Decision Making in Canada just as the campaign heats up is surely not coincidental. In any case, election or not, this is a wonderful initiative and…

Gabriella Coleman’s Hacker, Hoaxer, Whistleblower, Spy: The Many Faces of Anonymous is largely a laudatory history of the Anonymous hacker activist movement with some anthropological and political analysis. Whitney Phillips’ This Is Why We Can’t Have Nice Things: Mapping the Relationship between Online Trolling and Mainstream Culture on the other hand, is much more geared…

Sydney Padua’s The Thrilling Adventures of Lovelace and Babbage is one of the most flat-out entertaining books I have read in a very long time. You should buy this book. Your library should buy this book. Buy a copy of this book for all your friends. What’s all the fuss? TTAoLaB is a graphic novelization…

In the Late Harper period of Canadian politics it’s getting harder and harder to tell the difference between satire and legitimate news stories. Here’s a couple of examples of satire followed by one that’s even scarier and more disturbing because it’s an actual news story. We live in interesting times. Fortunately there’s a election coming…

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