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I’ll be at Science Online Together for the next few days. I missed last year so I’m really looking forward to getting back into the Science Online swing of things. As is occasionally my habit, I’ll be listing here some attendees that are either Canadian, librarians or, in a few select cases, both. I’m adding…

I have a son who’s in the middle of his second year as a physics undergrad. As you can imagine, I occasionally pass along a link or two to him pointing to stuff on the web I think he might find particularly interesting or useful. Thinking on that fact, I surmised that perhaps other science…

I love science, I love science fiction. The common misconception about science fiction in particular is that it is somehow about the future, about predicting and describing it. Same with science, in a slightly different way. Science (and technology…) should be about inventing the best gizmos to make life the easiest and most pleasant. In…

Welcome to the rebooted science interview series here at Confessions of a Science Librarian! The previous incarnation mostly concentrated on people in the broadly defined scholarly communications community, like Mark Patterson of eLife, Peter Binfield and Jason Hoyt of PeerJ or author Michael Nielsen. The series has been extremely irregular for the last few years…

Many of my readers may recall that back in October I published a post announcing the Draft Open Access Policy consultation process launched by the Canadian Tri-Councils — Social Sciences & Humanities Research Council, Natural Sciences & Engineering Research Council and Canadian Institutes of Health Research. The deadline for submissions was December 13th. Since the…

Sometimes a book isn’t quite what you expected. And you’re disappointed. Sometimes a book isn’t quite what you expected and you’re pleasantly surprised. Chris Impey and Holly Henry’s Dreams of Other Worlds: The Amazing Story of Unmanned Space Exploration definitely falls into the latter category. What was I expecting? From the subtitle I was hoping…

Taking a Longer View Why librarianship is difficult and contentious Schism in the Stacks: Is the University Library As We Know It Destined for Extinction? The Future of Libraries: Harvard Students Are Thinking Outside the Box Why piles of bad applications may not portend disaster Silencing, librarianship, and gender: sticking up for stories Making Space…

Silicon Valley goes to school – notes on Californian capitalism and the ‘disruption’ of public education The End of Higher Education’s Golden Age The Death Of Expertise Closing Time for the Open Internet Tech Workers, Political Speech and Economic Threat Does Ikea Hold The Secret To The Future Of College? Let’s Be Real: Online Harassment…

A couple of weeks ago I was approached by Rabble.ca to write a piece for them with some of my thoughts about the current controversy surrounding the government of Canada’s closure of several Department of Fisheries and Oceans libraries. I have a link compilation here. I was happy to write up something and it appeared…

Looking over all the books I read in 2013, there’s one non-fiction book that really stands out as the best. Former astronaut Chris Hadfield’s memoir An Astronaut’s Guide to Life on Earth. wasn’t the deepest or most information-packed book I read last year, but it was the most entertaining and involving. And it’s core message…

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