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I think this post might signal the birth of a new all-consuming blogging obsession — climate change in general and specifically how the realities of climate change play out in the Canadian context, especially as it relates to public policy. With the COP21 climate talks coming up in Paris, this seems like as good a…

Best Science Books 2015: Amazon.com

As you all have no doubt noticed over the years, I love highlighting the best science books every year via the various end of year lists that newspapers, web sites, etc. publish. I’ve done it so far in 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013 and 2014. And here we are in 2015! As in previous…

From the “so funny it hurts” file…. ‘Seek Funding’ Step Added To Scientific Method PARIS—In an effort to modernize the principles and empirical procedures of examining phenomena and advancing humanity’s collective knowledge, the International Council for Science announced Thursday the addition of a “Seek Funding” step to the scientific method. …. “Next, scientists simply modify…

A couple of weeks ago I gave a presentation as part of Open Access Week at the Ontario College of Art and Design University (ie. OCADU) on “predatory” open access journals. It seemed to be well-received at the time and since then I’ve gotten some positive feedback as well. So I thought I’d share the…

As I’ve extensively chronicled, Canadian government science had some pretty rough years under the government of former Prime Minister Stephen Harper. But Canada has a new government, a new prime minister in Justin Trudeau and a new cabinet. Kirsty Duncan, an actual scientist who worked on the IPPC, has been appointed Science Minister. Come to…

My library is hosting a Ada Lovelace Day event tomorrow (ok, a little late…). Continuing in a tradition of having Women in Science Wikipedia Edit-a-thons, we’re hosting our own Wikipedia Women in Science Edit-a-thon! I’ve been doing a fair bit of reading over the last couple of years about Wikipedia culture and especially how it…

As you can all imagine, I’m quite pleased to see the backside of the Harper government on their way out the door. Of course, the Liberals have promised a lot but only time will tell how serious they are about fixing the science-related stuff that they’ve promised to fix. I’ll definitely be watching that and…

Serving the Reich: The Struggle for the Soul of Physics under Hitler by Philip Ball and Planck: Driven by Vision, Broken by War by Brandon R. Brown are two of the best history of science books I’ve read in a very long time. And even though they’re both about World War II, some seventy years…

Though not explicitly tied to our current federal election campaign, the début this week of the Science Integrity Project and the publishing of their Statement of Principles for Sound Decision Making in Canada just as the campaign heats up is surely not coincidental. In any case, election or not, this is a wonderful initiative and…

It’s tempting to go a couple of different ways here. A book that has “Insanely Great” in the title? What could possibly go wrong? On the other hand…. A kids book about what a jerk Steve Jobs was. What could possibly go wrong? Steve Jobs: Insanely Great by Jessie Hartland. An illustrated biography of Steve…

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