The Corpus Callosum

They Should Do This in D.C.

href="http://www.southwestbioenergy.com/html/news_release__.html">Southwest
BioEnergy has announced a plan to build a href="http://www1.eere.energy.gov/biomass/">biomasss
electrical generation facility in href="http://www.google.com/maps?q=Vado,+NM,+USA&sa=X&oi=map&ct=title">Vado,
New Mexico.  Vado is rather close to the middle of
nowhere, but it also happens to be very close to a whole lotta cattle
and cows.  Said quadrupeds produce about 275 tons of
manure
per day.  

face="Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif">i-f10a7a5bd2011f36270edeabba5fbecf-dairybarn.jpg

Sounds like a joke, but it is not.  They think they can
squeeze five megawatts out of what otherwise would
be waste material.  They may be able to scale that up to 18
megawatts.  Their news release is a bit vague, but they do
reveal that they will use a “non-polluting” href="http://egov.oregon.gov/ENERGY/RENEW/Biomass/bioenergy.shtml#Pyrolysis">pyrolytic
technology.

Such facilities will not by, themselves, meet all our energy needs, due
to practical limitations.  They are practical only when
located near large supplies of manure.  Washington D.C. comes
to mind.

(HT: href="http://alternativecomment.blogspot.com/2007/05/five-megawatt-biomass-plant-to-be-built.html">Alternative
Comment)
 

Comments

  1. #1 monson
    May 13, 2007

    Would human sewage work?

  2. #2 big
    May 13, 2007

    Science Daily has an article on using “biochar” to increase soli carbon storage -and soil fertility:
    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/05/070511211255.htm
    In this case, they want to anaerobically heat the material (animal or plant waste), and use the liberated volatiles, but bury the carbonized remains. They estimate 10% of US carbon emmisions could be seqestered in this manner.