The Frontal Cortex

Archives for June, 2007

There’s something unbearably poignant about scientific discoveries that delineate the limitations of science. Dennis Overbye explains: Our successors, whoever and wherever they are, may have no way of finding out about the Big Bang and the expanding universe, according to one of the more depressing scientific papers I have ever read. If things keep going…

The Political Brain

Matt Yglesias makes an important psychological point about political debates: My read of what I see in these debates is so heavily colored by ex ante beliefs and information that it’s hard for the debate to change anything. During the first 100 days question, for example, John Edwards gave his spiel about “restoring American leadership”…

Radio Lab

The new season of Radio Lab has begun. For those of who aren’t NPR junkies, Radio Lab is a sonically dense, narrative driven science shown broadcast out of WNYC. Each episode has a theme (ala This American Life), and then explores the theme from a variety of different angles. I’d love the show even if…

An Expensive Skull

I’m not a big Damien Hirst fan, but this is really beautiful: The diamond encrusted skull, which is estimated to be worth more than $50 million, comes from the skeleton of a man who lived between 1720 and 1810.

Razib has a frighteningly smart post on religion, secularism, Korea, etc., but I thought this excerpt was worth noting: Religion adapts to the world as it is, engaging in dynamic processes of retrofitting. If supernaturalism is the cognitive default in many then the details of the religious narrative are of only proximate importance. But, I…