Human Rights

Category archives for Human Rights

Academic Warfare?

This post was co-authored by Ali Arab, Ph.D., an assistant professor of statistics at Georgetown University. We are living in a global society driven by innovation, creativity and entrepreneurship. Success depends upon free access to information and unfettered research by scholars. Yet targeted academic boycotts are increasingly common, throwing more and more roadblocks on the…

Taking a Bite from the Poisoned Apple

This post was co-authored by Natasha Bahrami, a foreign policy researcher, and Ali Arab, Ph.D., an assistant professor of statistics at Georgetown University. Last month, a young American woman was blocked from purchasing an Apple product at a local store in Alpharetta, Georgia. After overhearing her speaking Farsi, the second generation Iranian-American was informed that…

Five Dinners with President Ahmadinejad

Dr. Jim Walsh     The imagination reels.  Five dinners with Iran’s President Ahmadinejad.  What would you discuss?  What would be your top questions? MIT alumnus Dr. Jim Walsh did just that, and will report to us via an interview on Monday, June 4 via a live chat.  From the announcement: My Five Dinners with…

Global Hunger Games

Hunger Games – World Food Programme. Hunger Games portrays a grim future in which the “bottom 99%” must ration their food to reduce the chance that their children will be sent as “tributes” to compete in a game to the death. But – What if, together, we can identify thousands of new paths out of…

Mindful Elephants Don’t Stomp on Grass

Photo source. “There’s an African saying: When the elephants fight, the grass suffers.” Dartmouth College President Jim Yong Kim on the greatest challenge in global health, in a recent interview with Charlie Rose, pointing out that the “poorest of poor suffer the most.”

What ever happened to Ndugu?

To me, Ndugu, the little Tanzanian boy, embodies potential. Now he would be a teenager. What ever happened to Ndugu?

New Anthrax Scare in Pakistan

Color-enhanced scanning electron micrograph shows splenic tissue from a monkey with inhalational anthrax; featured are rod-shaped bacilli (yellow) and an erythrocyte (red) Credit: Arthur Friedlander A university professor has allegedly mailed anthrax to the Pakistani prime minister’s office in October, accoding to today’s The New York Times. Could this be the beginning of a new…

An Intellectual Threat in Bahrain?

Photo source. Earlier I wrote a post about Prof. Al-Singace, a Bahraini engineer sentenced to life in prison, forced to appeal on September 11. Sadly, another example has emerged of the denial of due process to a scholar, in a region where intellectuals are viewed as a potential threat.

Tahrir Square, February 9, 2011. Photo source. This article was co-authored with Jessica Wyndham, a human rights lawyer. As we mark Human Rights Day 2011 on December 10, it is impossible to ignore a clear theme that has emerged during the year — the use, misuse and abuse of technology in support and in violation…

This article was co-authored with Dr. Morad Abou-Sabe’, President of the Arab American League of Voters of New Jersey. CNN’s Ivan Watson talks to John King from Cairo about his exclusive interview with Egyptian activist Wael Ghonim. {February 9, 2011} The Egyptian revolution of January 25th, 2011 created widespread euphoria of the kind only wide-eyed…