Deep Sea News

 
i-e087efac83bfb18c956b2baab4118bc7-jumbosquid.jpg

Several news agencies are reporting today about an interesting phenomenon occurring in the Mississippi River.

The Memphis Flyer reports

In the last two years hurricanes have ravaged the Gulf coast causing millions of dollars of damage to property and the loss of numerous lives. More powerful hurricanes also destroyed millions of acres of marshes. “The significant loss of marshes on the southern Louisiana coast has allowed for Gulf of Mexico water to migrate up the Mississippi River,” stated Dr. April Montgomery of the National Hurricane Center. This increases the saltiness of the river, what scientists refer to as salinity, letting several ocean organisms to move up the river. “Currently we have reports of marine species reaching as far up as Helena, Arkansas,” noted Dr. Seth O’Dod. A deep-sea squid, however, has lead the invasion with record numbers. “Loligo fakei, a species typically found typically in the deep Gulf of Mexico, is moving up the Mississippi in dense schools but dying when they reach the warmer waters south of Memphis,” stated O’Dod. Apparently, huge masses of dead squid are being found on the shores of the river.

I love this quote from Earl Jones in the Helena Independent Record.

“My family has been farming the shores of the river for 10 generations and I ain’t never seen anything like this. The stank is awful but we been collecting them and spreading them across the field as fertilizer. We should have a better crop of soybeans this year.”

 Lower Mississippi River map showing areas of unconfirmed sightings of L. fakei 



Comments

  1. #1 Disgusted in St. Louis
    April 1, 2007

    I doubt any will make it as far as St. Louis, but this seems to be an inaccuracy in the news report: “dying when they reach the warmer waters south of Memphis.” I don’t think the cause of death is from the water temperature getting warmer as they move further north up the Mississippi. Isn’t it more likely they are dying from the drop in salinity or lower water temperature?

  2. #2 Ian Wood
    April 1, 2007

    Posting news like this on April 1st definitely requires the extra saltiness – or at least a pinch of it.

    Ian

  3. #3 Firebyrd
    April 1, 2007

    Hee. I love the scientific name of the squid in question.

  4. #4 DDeden
    April 1, 2007

    Hate to say it, but you got me hook & sinker! Mississippi squid, got a ring to it, title of my next song maybe.

    DDeden

  5. #5 Melusine
    April 2, 2007

    The stank is awful but we been collecting them and spreading them across the field as fertilizer. We should have a better crop of soybeans this year.

    Lol!

    Ddeden:

    Old black water, keep on rollin
    Mississippi squid, wont you keep on shinin on me
    Old black water, keep on rollin
    Mississippi squid, wont you keep on shinin on me

  6. #6 Jim Lemire
    April 2, 2007

    Nice. You had me. I was just about to send the post to my brother who works for the Northeast fisheries observers – we’ve been sending squid stories back and forth all year. Luckily I reread the post and noticed the scientific name and the post category. Nicely done.

  7. #7 Sharon Ewe
    April 2, 2007

    This is a hilarious April Fool’s joke! I’m definitely going to pass this along.

  8. #8 Paul
    April 2, 2007

    Southern-fried calamari, yummmm. Can’t wait.

The site is currently under maintenance and will be back shortly. New comments have been disabled during this time, please check back soon.