Archives for November, 2004

Fumento Follies V

Yes, he’s back! Over at his website Fumento has posted Hate Mail, Volume 32, which contains his creatively edited version of our exchange. According to Fumento, it went like this: Fumento: And no, the Lancet column I wrote didn’t just appear in the four papers you mentioned. It appears in places you don’t even know…

The Lavoisier Group

The Lavoisier group is an Australian astroturf operation. John Quiggin observed that: This body is devoted to the proposition that basic principles of physics, discovered by among others, the famous French scientist Antoine Lavoisier, cease to apply when they come into conflict with the interests of the Australian coal industry. Melissa Fyfe has an interesting…

Lott on the Lancet study

The latest pundit to attack the Lancet study is somebody called John Lott. He writes: I haven’t spent a lot of time going through the methodology used in this survey by Lancet, but I don’t know how one could assume that those surveyed couldn’t have lied to create a false impression. After all, some do…

Finishing off Kaplan

I haven’t commented on Kaplan’s shoddy critique of the Lancet because Daniel Davies already demolished it here. Kaplan did have one argument that Davies did not address, so I will deal with that in this post. Kaplan wrote: The survey team simply could not visit some of the randomly chosen clusters; the roads were blocked…

Wapo 1 Oxblog 0

David Adesnik has replied to my post on malnutrition in Iraq. He has conceded that the Washington Post was reporting the results of a new survey rather than the results of one from 2003. But he is still arguing that the war did not cause the increase in malnutrition seen in the 2003 study: The…

Infant mortality and the Lancet study

One of the arguments made against the Lancet study was that the study had greatly underestimated the pre-war mortality rate, because the study found that it was about 29 per 1000 live births, while UNICEF estimated that it was 108. Now the 108 dates from 1999, but sceptics doubted that it could have declined dramatically…

Malnutrition in Iraq

Chris Bertram points out that a new study suggests that the Lancet‘s finding of an increase in infant mortality following the invasion of Iraq is correct. The Washington Post reports: After the rate of acute malnutrition among children younger than 5 steadily declined to 4 percent two years ago, it shot up to 7.7 percent…

Dog Treats

Our dog has developed a fear of traffic. Since we live on a busy street, this is a problem. It all started when he was crossing the street with Carmen and a car went through the red light without even slowing, passing less than a metre in front of him and smashing into the side…

Grogblogging

Darp and Jess organized a get together of bloggers in Sydney last Friday. I wandered along and, well, there were a lot of people there. Despite having been to two previous such gatherings, the only bloggers I had met before were Jason Soon and c8to. I’m too lazy to link to everybody so I’m going…

The latest pundit to have a go at the Lancet study is Andrew Bolt. Like most of the critics, Bolt just does not have the statistical background to produce a competent critique. In Bolt’s case this is even less excusable, since he had the benefit of the Economist‘s excellent article, but unfortunately Bolt does not…