Kellermann

Category archives for Kellermann

Gun Control Advocates Purvey Deadly Myths Wall Street Journal, 11 Nov. 1998 By John R. Lott Jr. The family gun is more likely to kill you or someone you know than to kill in self-defense. The 1993 study yielding such numbers, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, never actually inquired as to whose…

The authors of the bibliography are quite correct when they state that a case-control study could measure a net protective effect of firearms. EdgarSuter writes: “could” if death were the only legitimate measurement of the protective benefits of guns. Wrong. “could” if protection from death is a legitimate use of a firearm. Mr. Lambert’s quibbling…

Edgar Suter writes: In Kellermann’s most recent study of homicide (Kellermann et al. “Gun Ownership as a Risk Factor for Homicide in the Home.” NEJM Oct 7, 1993; 329(15):1084-1091.) notes “Two hundred nine victims (49.8 percent) died from gunshot wounds.” Prof. Schaffer offers a robust [and successful] effort to show that the “gun in the…

The study controlled for literally dozens of other factors, including criminality and illicit drugs. Furthermore the extra homicide risk associated with firearm ownership was not from shootouts between drug dealers or gangs, but domestic homicides. Dr. Paul Blackman writes: No. The study measured about 2.5 dozen items, but controlled for about six — with a…

Dr. Paul H. Blackman writes: But let’s get back to the estimates of gun ownership by the cases and the controls. OK. Unlike Dr Suter’s straw man argument this is a real threat to the study. If gun ownership of the cases is under-reported more than gun ownership of the controls is under-reported, the correlation…

A limitation on the earlier (43-1) study is not necessarily a limitation on the later case-control study. The authors of the bibliography are quite correct when they state that a case-control study could measure a net protective effect of firearms. Dr. Paul H. Blackman writes: The earlier study noted that one couldn’t fully evaluate the…

Daniel D. Polsby writes: Unless I am seriously mistaken, one would find that crack cocaine dealers and other persistent criminals are disproportionately likely to possess firearms and to be murdered by others using firearms. To place firearms at the heart of this story is at best tendentious. The study controlled for literally dozens of other…

Edgar Suter writes: Dr. Kellermann’s subsequent research “finding” that a gun in the home increases risk used a method that cannot distinguish between “cause” and “effect.” Kellermann’s illogical conclusion would be like finding more insulin in the homes of diabetics and so concluding that insulin “causes” diabetes. Interestingly Kellermann’s own data show that when a…

You said that they failed to take into account the possibility that “violent people (gang members for example) are both more likely to get firearms and are more likely to get themselves killed”. Kellermann et al (in the abstract) “case households more commonly contained an illicit-drug user, a person with prior arrests, or someone who…

The study found that having a gun in the home was not associated with any increased risk of non-gun homicide, only with gun homicide. Dan Day writes: Gun homicide in the home of the victim, Tim, which is what the study examined. So now we have the totally unremarkable finding that if you get shot…