knives

Category archives for knives

Peter Proctor wrote: An equivalent wound is ( by definition ) an equivalent wound . Absent LET effects, it doesn’t matter much where it came from. Oh, so your statement was a tautology? By “equivalent”, you meant of equivalent lethality? Hole, I meant an equivalent hole. Pretty simple concenpt, actually. Surprised I have to explain…

Peter H. Proctor writes: E.g., the original issue was whether Pistols are much less deadly than long guns because pistol fatalities are mostly proportional to the size of the permanent wound channel. Doubly wrong. First, the issue addressed by my cites is your claim that handgun and knife wounds are equally deadly. You have yet…

Peter H. Proctor writes: > 2) The main factor was apparently the substitution of handguns for > long guns as home defense weapons. For penetrating trunchal > wounds, the mortality rate for handguns is 15-20 %, roughly the > same as for equivalent knife wounds. For (e.g) shotguns, the > mortality rate is 70% or…

In Point Blank Gary Kleck writes: The aggressor’s possession of a handgun in a violent incident apparently exerts a very slight net positive effect on the likelihood of the victim’s death. The linear probability interpretation of the OLS coefficient implies that the presence of a handgun increases the probability of the victim’s death by 1.4%.…

Orion writes: Statscan tells us that of all violent assaults that are not immediately fatal your odds of survival are better if you are shot rather than stabbed (some people aren’t even immediately aware that they have been shot!). Knife wounds tend to be large, ugly and tough to repair ass opposed to neat little…

Michael J. Phelps writes: Wright (1983) compare handgun attacks with long bladed knife attacks; as do Wilson & Sherman (1961 p 643) with findings of: mortality rate for handguns: 16.8% ice picks: 14.3 butcher knives: 13.3 Kleck has made a dishonest selection of data from Wilson & Sherman: from the same table that the figures…

(C. D. Tavares) writes: Report to the Nation on Crime and Justice, Second Edition, U.S. Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics, NCJ-105506, March 1988. For 1985, for robbery and assaults, the following is how many incidents involved a firearm and how many involved a knife. Robbery Assault ——- ——- Firearm 23% 12% Knife 21%…

Point Blank, by Gary Kleck, pg 165, citing a study by Wilson and Sherman, 1961: “At least one medical study compared very similar sets of wounds (‘all were penetrating wounds of the abdomen’), and found that the mortality rate in pistol wounds was 16.8%, while the rate was 14.3% for ice pick wounds and 13.3%…

With-gun robberies are three times as likely as with-knife robberies to be fatal to the victim[1], and it seems plausible that this lethality extends to other crimes. Andy Freeman said: No, with-gun robberies are not three times as likely as with-knife robberies to be fatal to the victim. Lambert consistently “misreports” Zimring’s data. It is…