More Guns Less Crime

Category archives for More Guns Less Crime

You keep using that word …

Lott has published an op-ed in the New York Post on the NAS panel. Lott once again claims that the panel was stacked: The panel was set up during the Clinton administration, and all but one of its members (whose views on guns were publicly known before their appointments) favored gun control. In his op-ed…

Jim Lindgren thinks the panel was too generous to Lott: From the portions that I have read, I found the report sober, impressive, and fair, though there are substantial parts of this literature that I am unfamiliar with. As to Lott’s work, I actually thought that the Council’s report was too generous to his research…

Lott responds to the NAS Panel

As I predicted, Lott claims that the panel was stacked: My piece in the LA Times is still accurate today. While I will write up a more substantive discussion, James Q. Wilson’s very unusual dissent in the first appendix says a lot. Wilson concluded that all the research provided “confirmation of the findings that shall-issue…

Stuart Benjamin writes: [John Lott’s] core thesis, though, was called into doubt by a number of researchers, most prominently in a study (and reply, both complete with data sets) written by Ian Ayres and John Donohue, two top empirical economists. They concluded that the data did not support Lott’s assertions regarding right-to-carry laws and crime.…

The National Academy of Sciences panel on firearms and violence has reported its findings. The press release says: There is no credible evidence that “right-to-carry” laws, which allow qualified adults to carry concealed handguns, either decrease or increase violent crime. To date, 34 states have enacted these laws. There is almost no evidence that violence-prevention…

Push poll on concealed carry

Lott has a new post on blog where he writes: 6/15/04 Two-thirds of Police Chiefs think Right-to-carry Laws Reduce Crime A new survey by the National Association of Chiefs of Police asks members: “Do you agree that a national concealed handgun permit would reduce rates of violent crime as recent studies in some states have…

Lott tries to rewrite history, again.

Summary: Lott now claims that an incriminating file where he had been caught cooking his results was not meant to have been on his website and was only there because his webmaster screwed up. Unfortunately, his latest story is full of holes. Way back in September last year I detailed how, after Ayres and Donohue…

Helland and Tabarrok’s paper ‘Using Placebo Laws to Test “More Guns, Less Crime”‘ has been published in Advances in Economic Analysis & Policy. Their objective was to correct for serial correlations in the crime data. I explained earlier how, if crimes rates in adjacent counties tend to behave in the same way, results could wrongly…

The Oct 12 Wichita Eagle has a story with a brief comment from John Donohue on Lott’s work: Among his most vocal academic critics is John Donohue, a Stanford University law professor whose published critiques of Lott’s works cite errors in handling crime data. “It’s abundantly clear that there is no support for his thesis,”…

How many coding errors were there?

On August 18, in his interview with Chris Mooney, when he was asked if there were coding errors, Lott replied: There are a couple minor errors, the data is on, the data is available for anybody to look at, anybody can go and download the data, I’ve made it so that people can go and…