Developing Intelligence

Archives for January, 2007

Normal children – and adult patients with frontal damage – frequently have difficulty changing their responses to stimuli when the correct response changes. This difficulty is often considered an inability to switch between rules, but might result not so much from an inability to switch as from an inability to represent the stimuli as having…

Change Blindness and Attention

If a large object were to suddenly disappear from your field of view, you might expect that you would notice its disappearance. However, change detection research has demonstrated that we have a surprisingly poor ability to detect even large changes to a visual scene (see here and here for examples).

Encephalon 15

Encephalon 15 has been posted. Check it out!

If presented with a novel and a familiar object, infants strongly prefer to touch and look at novel objects. However, if these objects are then obscured – in the dark, or by an occluding screen – infants tend to reach more in the direction of the familiar objects. Some argue that the familiar objects are…

Yesterday I reviewed several detailed architectural asymmetries between the right and left hemispheres, but presented little information on asymmetries in long-range connectivity. Recent advances in a form of magnetic resonance imaging called “diffusion tensor MRI” have made possible whole-brain imaging of white matter tracts, which are important for long-range connectivity in the brain. So, how…

In their 2003 Trends in Neurosciences article, Hutsler & Galuske refer to the well-known history of hemispheric asymmetry research as too focused on large-scale morphological differences, at the expense of microanatomical and connectivity differences. An understanding of these more detailed structural differences might translate into a more detailed understanding of hemispheric differences in computation and…

“Imagine that the U.S. is preparing for the outbreak of an unusual Asian disease, which is expected to kill 600 people. Two alternative programs to combat the disease have been proposed.” The first program will save 200 people. The second program has a 33% probability of saving all 600 people, but a 67% chance that…

Although grammar is usually considered the “uniquely human” aspect of language, and the capacity to use primitive symbols is thought to be common among primates, high-level cognition is nonetheless strongly impacted by the use of symbols. For example, symbols can help in putative inhibition tasks; labeling a stimulus-response relationship can result in increased proactive interference…

Blogging on the Brain: 1/22

Gyorgy Buzsaki, author of “Rhythms of the Brain,” agreed to answer 10 questions posed by me and amnestic at GNXP. Covers computational modeling, 1/f noise, cortical homogeneity, and much more. A steeper forgetting curve among those with a college education? Imaging the neural representation of number. (Also at Neuromarketing.) Goal representation in hippocampus!?! Can anybody…

Although even the youngest infants have some ability to remember the past, this ability increases in both its reliability and its “temporal extent” with age. Such differences could result from changes in any of memory’s constituent processes, including encoding, consolidation, or retrieval. Although this week’s posts have focused on the idea that source monitoring difficulties…