Developing Intelligence

Archives for March, 2007

The infamous “binding problem” concerns how a coherent subjective experience of the world can emerge from the widely-distributed processing of individual object characteristics (for example, object identity and object spatial locations appear to be processed by independent neural systems). It is clear that binding requires focused attention (at least, according to “Feature Integration Theory”), but…

Inhibitory Decline In Childhood?

According to artificial neural network models that implement lateral inhibition, activation and inhibition are two sides of the same coin. These models often assume that patterns of activation compete with one another. In other words, in a given space of neural tissue (or “layer” in network terms), some particular pattern will become most active. This…

Prospective memory involves remembering to remember – in other words, successfully executing a planned intention after having completed an unrelated task. If computational models of prospective memory (PM) are to be believed, then PM relies on many of the same mechanisms involved in a huge variety of other tasks. For example, the successful execution of…

To what extent is music like language? Previously, I’ve reviewed how music and language share semantic characteristics, at least insofar as similar scalp electrical activity follows incongruent musical passages as follows incongruent words. But is it also possible that music has grammar, just like language? In the context of language, ungrammatical words are often accompanied…

Cognitive theories of “executive function” vary greatly in the number of distinct cognitive processes they propose to subserve the goal-directed coordination of behavior. Some theories suggest that strong active maintenance of information, and a way of “updating” the information that is maintained, is sufficient to explain performance on executive function (EF) tasks, which typically require…