Developing Intelligence

Archives for May, 2007

“Where is it, this present? It has melted in our grasp, fled ere we could touch it, gone in the instant of becoming.” – William James, 1890 Extremely dangerous, traumatic, or surprising moments are often accompanied by reports that time seemed to “slow down” or “fly by.” The perceptual basis of these subjective temporal distortions…

Hemispatial neglect might be the most striking example of brain trauma’s cognitive effects: patients with damage to right parietal regions appear unaware of the left half of space. For example, they’ll often shave only the right side of their face, will only eat food from the right half of their plate, and when asked to…

In his famous essay, Thomas Nagel suggested that science’s reductionist methods can never provide a complete understanding of the “subjective qualities” of consciousness. To illustrate this problem, he wrote that there was “no reason to suppose that” we would ever be able to comprehend what it’s like to be a bat – because we can’t…

What neural mechanisms underlie “fluid intelligence,” the ability to reason and solve novel problems? This is the question addressed by Gray et al. in Nature Neuroscience. The authors begin by suggesting that fluid intelligence (aka, gF) is related to both attentional control and active maintenance of information in the face of ongoing processing (i.e., working…