Developing Intelligence

Archives for January, 2008

Phil Stearns has constructed a 45 “neuron” network of electronic parts which responds to lights and tones with a (rather cute) squealing sound. A picture of the components for this strange device: Each “neuron” consisted of analog electronics corresponding to each of 6 functions: Input, Summing, Threshold, “Offset,” “Output,” and “Structure” (not sure about those…

UPDATE: Diebold effect explained? Marc has an excellent summary of a flurry of Diebold-related discussions between me, “T“, Marc, and Sean. Sean also has a network model of the apparent Diebold effect. I think we’ll soon hear from Brian Mingus (who’s running a meta-classifier) and Steve Freeman (an expert on machine-effects in elections) as well.…

Update: Diebold Effect explained. Here’s a unique approach to understanding the Diebold effect: S.Walker has dealt with a potential multicolinearity problem between predictors by taking the principal components of a variety of demographic variables. My brief rejoinder: the residuals of a logistic regression to predict the presence of Diebold machines based on Clinton Campaign presence,…

Update: Diebold effect explained. Jon Stewart famously accused the Crossfire co-hosts as “hurting America” by imitating the style and appearance of political debate to disguise partisan hackery and vacuous strawman arguments. In the case of the recent NH primary, the same criticism can be leveled at the mainstream media (e.g. this discussion of a red…

UPDATES: Diebold effect explained. (previous: 1, 2, 3, 4 5 6 (a nonlinear approach) 7) In contrast to exit pre-election polls, the final vote tally from the NH democratic primary shows a surprise victory for Hillary Clinton. People quickly noticed an anomaly in the voting tallies which seemed to show an advantage to Hillary conferred…

Filtering Perception To Save Memory

One of the bottlenecks in human memory capacity is its “filtering efficiency” – irrelevant information in memory only detracts from an already-constrained memory span. New work by McNab & Klingberg images the neural structure directly responsible for such filtering, and shows it can predict behavioral measures of memory span. Impressively, the location of this “memory…

Josh Hartshorne, coauthor of a the Hartshorne & Ullman study I’ve discussed before, has a new blog that’s already filled with interesting posts. What is to blame for psychology’s awful PR? Does workforce diversity improve productivity? Why languages can’t be learned (though my own “careful reflection” leads me to a different belief, as discussed here).

A new educational system called “Tools of the Mind” teaches not facts and figures, but rather focuses on cognitive skills in structured play. In the largest and most compelling study yet, exposure to this curriculum in the classroom drastically improves performance on a variety of psychometric and neuropsychological tests. Vygotskian theory posits that children need…

Mick Grierson has created a real-time EEG-based brain-computer interface for music synthesis. You can watch a video here. We’ve been designing experiments to test how classic ERPs (P300/600, N400, etc) may emerge from user interactions with this system, given previous demonstrations that those waveforms are sensitive to the “grammar” and “meaning” of musical harmonies, respectively.…

A continuing challenge in cognitive neuroscience is determining which neural structures are actually responsible for certain thoughts and behaviors. For example, fMRI and other neuroimaging techniques cannot tell us if a certain region of visual cortex is necessary for perceiving motion, or if it is merely coactivated whenever motion is perceived. Such distinctions are both…