Comparative Psychology

Developing Intelligence

Category archives for Comparative Psychology

Your body’s bilateral symmetry statistically predicts your health, probability of schizotypy and depression, number of sexual partners, and resting metabolic rate (particularly if you are male). Bodily symmetry may reflect “developmental stability” – i.e., influences like disease, mutation and stress may cause a developmental divergence from DNA’s symmetric blueprint. Not only do individuals differ in…

“To understand ourselves, we must embrace the alien.” – PZ Meyers One difficulty in understanding consciousness is the fact that we know of only one species that certainly possesses it: humans. A new article by Jennifer Mather suggests that octopi may also possess consciousness, despite the vastly different architecture of their brain. If two very…

There are many theories of how human behavior came to differ so profoundly from that of even our closest primate relatives – language, recursion, theory of mind, and enhanced working memory are just a few of the “critical components” that have been proposed as enabling human intelligence. A very different perspective, advocated by Tomasello and…

It seem reasonable that evolution might select for adaptive behaviors by increasing the relative size of particular brain regions that support those behaviors; for example, bats might have an enlarged auditory cortex since they navigate with echolocation. To some extent this does happen, but such differences are often apparent only after controlling for a much…