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Archives for July, 2006

How did the human genome ever get finished if every one of the three billion bases had to be reviewed by human eyes? In the early days of the human genome project, laboratory personnel routinely scanned printed copies of chromatograms, editing and reviewing all DNA sequences by eye. For more background, see the post on…

I mean phone call. Because, if I thought he remembered me, I would call and say “thank you.” Because of the time I spent in his lab, I know that cloning started long before Dolly. The first vertebrate animal was cloned over 50 years ago. And it wasn’t a sheep.

My colleagues have come up will all kinds of interesting bloggy things to use as an excuse for Friday celebrations. Adventures in Ethics and Science has Friday Sprog Blogging for cute stories about her kids. A Blog Around the Clock considers Friday’s the perfect day to write about weird sex. Pharyngula salutes the spineless with…

Our official challenge period has ended, but that doesn’t mean that our drive to support science education has to stop. I’m keeping a Donors Choose button up in the side menu, just in case anybody feels the need to give back to society and help with science education. Now, I just need to study up…

What do genetic testing and genealogy have in common? The easy answer is that they’re both used by people who are trying to find out who they are, in more ways than one. Another answer is that both tests can involve DNA sequence data. And that leads us to another question. If the sequence of…

Past Favorites for the holidays: Now that the dog genome is done, maybe we need a new project in genetic variation. What genotypes make people look like their dogs? technorati tags: dogs, humor dog genome

Mendel’s Garden, that is. Enjoy a quiet mental stroll among the shady trees where Hsien Hsien Lei from Genetics and Health has compiled perennial favorites and annual suprises. Even though the season is young, Mendel’s Garden is clearly growing. This edition of Mendel’s Garden is great spot to branch out and explore the natural world.…

If you’re going to create a new life form (even if it’s only digital), Sunday seems like the best day to give it a try.

Pedro Beltao, of Public Rambling, has started a bioinformatics blogs carnival named Bio::Blogs. The first edition is up and ready to be read. This looks like a promising collection. technorati tags: carnival, bioinformatics

This summer I have a high school teacher working with me as an intern, because of an RET (Research Experience for Teachers) grant from the National Science Foundation. Yesterday, he told me a story about the science activity that really lit a fire in his class. His 75 students used PCR to amplify DNA from…