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Archives for September, 2006

On Tuesday night, we learned about a new animal. It’s shy, elusive, endangered, and a bad choice for a sixth grader’s animal report. It’s the Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus. They have an FAQ page and photos, so it must be true.

Over the summer, a few ScienceBloggers were pondering the question of why students disappear from science courses, never to return. James Hrynshyn wrote that we’re teaching youngsters the wrong thing. Zuska boldy pointed out the things that many of us think but don’t say out loud. Chad Orzel noted that science is hard and shared…

We went on an excursion last weekend to see the Dead Sea Scrolls at the Pacific Science Center. None of us could resist going downtown to look at written texts over 2000 years old. Uncovered in 1946, by a Bedouin shepherd, the scrolls have had an interesting history over the past 50 years, most of…

White people are mutants

Razib inspired me to share some of the story behind why white people are considered derivatives. Reposted from the Classic Digital Bio. No red herrings, here! Lamason et. al. found a single gene that controls human skin color while studying pigmentation in zebra fish (1).

Like computers? Like biology? Want to find a way to combine the two worlds? Bio::Blogs, a carnival at the intersection of biology, computing, and math, will be hosted here October 1st. For those of you who are wondering what this all means, it means that on Sunday, I will post a collection of links to…

As they say, there’s nothing like travel to learn new and unexpected things. Especially from cab drivers. One of my ScienceBlog Sibs, Shelly, spends time talking with cabbies about earwax, but I seem to invite other kinds of lectures.

and what is the volume of the sea? This sounds a bit like the beginning of a poem but it’s really the answer to the question we posed last week on a Digital Biology Friday.

Modified from the original post. Playing around with molecular structures is one of the more entertaining activities that you can do with digital biology. I’ve become totally entranced with molecular structures, both because they’re a fascinating art form and because every structure has its own story. I learned this because I ended up writing 69…

Today, we’re going to look for rainbows in double-stranded DNA and see what they can tell us about DNA structure.

Reposted and slightly modified from Classic DigitalBio. Some people say that science takes the magic out of everyday life. Not me! I’ve learned some things by reading Science (1) that might give some people nightmares, especially young children. Remember that scene in “The Wizard of Oz” when the trees get ticked off and start hurling…