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Archives for October, 2006

How can you extend a blood typing activity with an active learning approach? The blood typing lab, part I. What went wrong? and why? Blood typing part II. Can this laboratory be saved?

In the Big Rock Candy Mountains, there’s a land that’s fair and bright, The handouts grow on bushes and you sleep out every night Where the boxcars all are empty and the sun shines every day On the birds and the bees and the cigarete trees, The lemonade springs where the bluebird sings In the…

The blood typing lab, part I. What went wrong? and why? Blood typing part II. Can this laboratory be saved? Those wacky non-major Zoo students are at it again! And this time they drew blood! Mike’s undergraduate students learned about blood typing, a common tool of detectives and real crime TV. They did the classic…

Many science experiments are carefully thought out. Often, the procedures we follow have been thoroughly tested. We measure everything we can at every point that we can, so that we can determine if a procedure, like isolating DNA, is working properly and if the procedure doesn’t work, we can determine what went wrong. When the…

Many of you might take this for granted, and I know it seems amazing today, but I when first started teaching, our access to scientific literature was pretty limited. I could go to the UW and use Grateful Med to search Medline, but we didn’t have anything like it at my college and web browsers,…

Zuska never fails to make people think. And she made me wonder this and made me think that perhaps we could pass some names along to future Noble committees – you know, just in case they’re having trouble coming up with names of female scientists. Maybe we can be some help. I have a few…

PZ tells us that the people in Kensington have strong opinions about who discovered North America, and you can learn about them at the Kensington Runestone Museum. But I can top that. I saw an authentic Viking ship replica in Duluth, MN. And if you’re ever in Duluth – better remember this (whether you believe…

This may seem strange to anyone who hasn’t lived in Minnesota, but when I was a child, kids in my elementary school used to have fist fights when it came to the question of which famous European discovered America.

Awhile back Chemical & Engineering News published a fascinating article called “The Secret Life of Plant Crystals” with some wonderful photos of calcium oxalate crystals. Special cells (called “idioblasts”) produce these crystals, with shapes that are unique to each type of plant.

Some of my fellow ScienceBloggers have been hotly debating the role of male science faculty in perpetuating a climate that’s chilly and hostile to women. From one end of the ring, we’ve heard the classic complaint “It’s not my fault, I didn’t do it.” From the other end, we hear: “It is your fault because…