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Digital Biology Fridays

Category archives for Digital Biology Fridays

I’ve had some requests for some more molecular puzzles since the last one that I posted (see A DNA puzzle ). One person liked it so much he even blogged about it. So, here’s one for you to chew on over the weekend. This puzzle is a variation of an activity in Exploring DNA Structure,…

How does grass grow in the extremely hot soils of Yellowstone National Park? Could a protein from a virus help plants handle global warming? Okay, that second sentence is wild speculation, but we will try to find the answer to our mystery by aligning our protein sequence to a sequence from a related structure. tags:…

tags: plants, bioinformatics, sequence analysis, viruses, fungi How does grass grow in the extremely hot soils of Yellowstone National Park? The quest continues. Read part I, part II, part III, and part IV to see how we got here. And read onward to see where will we go.

I found it in the MeSH database. Really!

In last week’s episode, your assignment was to think of an interesting plant trait and find a description about a gene, related to that trait, by searching PubMed.

Many of you might take this for granted, and I know it seems amazing today, but I when first started teaching, our access to scientific literature was pretty limited. I could go to the UW and use Grateful Med to search Medline, but we didn’t have anything like it at my college and web browsers,…

and what is the volume of the sea? This sounds a bit like the beginning of a poem but it’s really the answer to the question we posed last week on a Digital Biology Friday.

Today, we’re going to look for rainbows in double-stranded DNA and see what they can tell us about DNA structure.

Why do I love Cn3D? Let me count the ways. What does Cn3D do? (Hint: say “Cn3D” out loud). Seriously, Cn3D is a program that draws lovely pictures of molecular structures by using experimental data from techniques like X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Surprisingly (to some), and in contrast to many bioinformatics programs,…

If we compare sections 1, 2, and 3, we see that section 2 matches very well in a number of different samples, and that there are differences between the sequences in sections 1 and 3. We also learn something about the people who did the experiment.