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Genetics & Molecular Biology

Category archives for Genetics & Molecular Biology

$1000 Genomes for $2000

Getting an accurate genome sequence requires that you collect the data at least twice argue Robasky, Lewis, and Church in their recent opinion piece in Nat. Rev. Genetics [1]. The DNA sequencing world kicked off 2014 with an audacious start. Andrew Pollack ran an article in the New York Times implying that 100,000 genomes will…

For the past few days I’ve been avidly following Daniel MacArthur’s tweets from the Personal Genome Conference at Cold Spring Harbor(@dgmacarthur #cshlpg). The Personal Genomics tweets aren’t just interesting because of the science, they’re interesting because MacArthur and others have started to take on the conventional dogma in genetic ethics. For years, there has been…

This morning I attended a “bloggers-only” conference call with Dr. Eric Green and the folks from the NIH Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) to hear about NHGRI’s new strategic plan. The new plan represents a shift away from viewing the genome through a lens marked “for research use only” and towards the goal of making…

One of my hobbies lately has been to get either RNA seq or microarray data from GEO and do quick analyses. Not only is this fun, I can find good examples to use for teaching biology. One of these fun examples comes from some Arabidopsis data. In this experiment, some poor little seedlings were taken…

You might think the coolest thing about the Next Generation DNA Sequencing technologies is that we can use them to sequence long-dead mammoths, entire populations of microbes, or bits of bone from Neanderthals. But you would be wrong.

No more delays! BLAST away!

We had a great discussion in the comments yesterday after I published my NJ trees from some of the flu sequences. If I list all the wonderful pieces of advice that readers shared, I wouldn’t have any time to do the searches, but there are a few that I want to mention before getting down…

What tells us that this new form of H1N1 is swine flu and not regular old human flu or avian flu? If we had a lab, we might use antibodies, but when you’re a digital biologist, you use a computer. Activity 4. Picking influenza sequences and comparing them with phylogenetic trees

This afternoon, I was working on educational activities and suddenly realized that the H1N1 strain that caused the California outbreak might be the same strain that caused an outbreak in 2007 at an Ohio country fair. UPDATE: I’m not so certain anymore that the strains are the same. I’m doing some work with nucleic acid…

I was pretty impressed to find the swine flu genome sequences, from the cases in California and Texas, already for viewing at the NCBI. You can get them and work them, too. It’s pretty easy. Tomorrow, we’ll align sequences and make trees. Activity 3: Getting the swine flu sequence data