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Genomics

Category archives for Genomics

Blaine Bettinger has an absolutely wonderful post where he compares his results for type 2 diabetes from 23andMe and DeCODEme. I really liked his post and I appreciated the way he showed the data from the two companies and elaborated on their interpretation of his genotype and his risk. Interestingly, his story goes beyond a…

An NSF post on Twitter this morning described an interesting study from the University of Pennsylanvia and Cornell University, that found that some people who call themselves “African Americans” may only be 1% West African, according to their DNA. The University of Pennsylvania press release contains other interesting findings as well. 365 individuals were studied…

You might think the coolest thing about the Next Generation DNA Sequencing technologies is that we can use them to sequence long-dead mammoths, entire populations of microbes, or bits of bone from Neanderthals. But you would be wrong.

One of the interesting things I learned today was that many people are calling for the genome sequences of the chimps and Macaques to be finished. This is especially amusing because the human genome isn’t quite done. We’re primates, too! Why not finish our genome?

Warfarin, a commonly used anti-clotting drug, sold under the brand name of Coumadin, has a been a poster child for the promise of pharmacogenomics and personalized medicine. The excitement has come from the idea that knowing a patient’s genotype, in this case for the VKORC1 and CYP2C9 genes, would allow physicians to tailor the dose…

No more delays! BLAST away!

We had a great discussion in the comments yesterday after I published my NJ trees from some of the flu sequences. If I list all the wonderful pieces of advice that readers shared, I wouldn’t have any time to do the searches, but there are a few that I want to mention before getting down…

Watching the chIPs roll in, then I watch them roll away again, I’m just sitting on the DNA, wasting time (sung to the tune of “Sitting on the dock of the bay” by Otis Redding) Hesselberth et.al. recently published a paper about digital genomic footprinting that blew me away because it has so much potential.…

For the past few months, the shake-up that began with Next Generation DNA Sequencing has been forcing me to adjust to a whole new view of things going on inside of a cell. We’ve been learning things these past two years that are completely changing our understanding of the genome and how it works and…

What do the missing Romanov children, genetically engineered humans, financial risk taking, and poop have in common? You can read about all these topics from this month’s Gene Genie carnival at Mary Meets Dolly. Who would have thought that mutations could be so much fun?