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molecular structures

Category archives for molecular structures

It’s been interesting to watch as microbiology’s own cold fusion debate has been raging. It began with an extraordinary claim about bacteria using arsenate as a replacement when phosphate concentrations are low (1).  It progressed when at least two scientist / bloggers ( here, and here) (not bloggers! the horrror! how uncivil!) gave public “journal…

Nick’s post on Amantadine resistance in swine flu was so interesting, I had to look at the protein structures myself. I couldn’t find any structures with the S31N mutation that Nick discussed, but I did find some structures with the M2 protein and Amantadine. Not only are these structures beautiful, but you can look at…

The grocery store magazine covers all say that home made gifts are big this year. So I thought, some of you might like to channel your inner Martha Stewart and make gifts with a science theme. Reposted in honor of the holiday and the economy. I’m here to help to you make a merry mug…

Some people, like Imelda Marcos and our new Dr. Isis, have a thing for fancy shoes. I go crazy for gadgets. technorati tags: iphone, DNA, molecules, molecular structure, molecular modeling, Science education For my birthday this year, my family bought me a new iPhone! Yeah! So, I’ve been killing several hours today filling it with…

but the red berries are RNA. Picture below the fold.

Want to learn more about Parkinson’s disease? See why a single nucleotide mutation messes up the function of a protein? I have a short activity that uses Cn3D (a molecular viewing program from the NCBI) to look at a protein that seems to be involved in a rare form of Parkinson’s disease and I could…

Lots of bloggers in the DNA network have been busy these past few days writing about Google’s co-founder Sergey Brin, his blog, his wife’s company (23andme), and his mutation in the LRRK2 gene. I was a little surprised to see that while other bloggers (here, here, here, and here) have been arguing about whether or…

Instead of enjoying a sunny summer day today, or partying with SciBlings in New York, I’m staring out my window watching the rain. Inspiration hit! What about searching for August? Folks, meet the HFQ protein from E. coli. I found this lovely molecule by doing a multi-database search at the NCBI with the term ‘August‘.

Over 2600 genetic diseases have been found where a change in a single gene is linked to the disease. One of the questions we might ask is how those mutations change the shape and possibly the function of a protein? If the structures of the mutant and wild type (normal) proteins have been solved, NCBI…

In the class that I’m teaching, we found that several PCR products, amplified from the 16S ribosomal RNA genes from bacterial isolates, contain a mixed base in one or more positions. We picked samples where the mixed bases were located in high quality regions of the sequence (Q >40), and determined that the mixed bases…