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Science education

Category archives for Science education

This morning I attended the Fifth Annual WBBA Governor’s Life Sciences Summit. The breakfast was great; the talks were okay.  I do enjoy the stories about people who’s lives were saved because of biotechnology and I agree that the focus of the summit, research and discovery are important, but I can’t help thinking about the…

This summer, I had the good fortune to attend three (or was it four?) conferences on science education. One of the most inspirational conferences was one on Vision and Change in Biology Education. This conference was co-sponsored by the National Science Foundation and the AAAS. It was a call to action for biology educators and…

I’ve just returned from two conferences that focused on educating students for careers in science and technology and what do I find here at the home fort? There’s Chad writing a very nice series on science careers! I was a little puzzled by PNAS acryonym in his titles since to me, PNAS stands for “Proceedings…

I don’t remember learning about plasma when I took physics, but it’s amazing stuff. Last week at the Hi-Tec conference in Arizona, I got to learn how an electromagnetic field can be used to push plasma around a tube. Community college students get to play with the coolest toys! Here’s some plasma contained in a…

Liveblogging from the Hi-Tec conference I’m currently at the Hi-Tec conference in Scottsdale, Arizona. (If you follow me on Twitter – www.twitter.com/@digitalbio – you may have seen me complaining about the temperature). It’s an interesting conference, so I’m going to share some of the things that I’m learning. Dr. Travis Benanti and Dr. Steve Fonash…

There aren’t many reports of 14 year-olds making scientific contributions. Even in the field of astronomy, Caroline Moore, the youngest person to discover a supernova, is a bit unusual. This supernova comes from Astronomy Picture of the day. Photo credits: High-Z Supernova Search Team, HST, NASA HT: National Science Foundation

For those of you who may have been wondering where I’ve been, these past few weeks have seen me grading final projects, writing a chapter on analyzing Next Gen DNA sequencing data for the Current Protocols series, and flying back and forth between Seattle and various meetings elsewhere in the U.S. It will probably take…

We always enjoy home science experiments and it was fun the other night to learn about a new experiment we could try with our teenage daughter and an iPhone. As it turned out, the joke was on us.

Nick’s post on Amantadine resistance in swine flu was so interesting, I had to look at the protein structures myself. I couldn’t find any structures with the S31N mutation that Nick discussed, but I did find some structures with the M2 protein and Amantadine. Not only are these structures beautiful, but you can look at…

No more delays! BLAST away!