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sequence analysis

Category archives for sequence analysis

In our series on why $1000 genomes cost $2000, I raised the issue that the $1000 genome is a value based on simplistic calculations that do not account for the costs of confirming the results. Next, I discussed how errors are a natural occurrence of the many processing steps required to sequence DNA and why…

I had the good fortune on Thursday to hear a fascinating talk on deep transcriptome analysis by Chris Mason, Assistant Professor, at the Institute for Computational Biomedicine at Cornell University.  Several intriguing observations were presented during the talk.  I’ll present the key points first and then discuss the data. These data concern the human transcriptome,…

These days, DNA sequencing happens in one of three ways. In the early days of DNA sequencing (like the 80′s), labs prepared their own samples, sequenced those samples, and analyzed their results. Some labs still do this. Then, in the 90′s, genome centers came along. Genome centers are like giant factories that manufacture sequence data.…

You might think the coolest thing about the Next Generation DNA Sequencing technologies is that we can use them to sequence long-dead mammoths, entire populations of microbes, or bits of bone from Neanderthals. But you would be wrong.

Last spring, I gave my first hands-on workshop in working with Next Generation Sequencing data at the Eighth Annual UT-ORNL-KBRIN Bioinformatics Summit at Fall Creek Falls State Park in Tennessee. The proceedings from that conference are now on-line at BMC Bioinformatics and it’s fun to look back and reflect on all that I learned at…

No more delays! BLAST away!

We’ll have a blast, I promise! But there’s one little thing we need to discuss first…

We had a great discussion in the comments yesterday after I published my NJ trees from some of the flu sequences. If I list all the wonderful pieces of advice that readers shared, I wouldn’t have any time to do the searches, but there are a few that I want to mention before getting down…

What tells us that this new form of H1N1 is swine flu and not regular old human flu or avian flu? If we had a lab, we might use antibodies, but when you’re a digital biologist, you use a computer. Activity 4. Picking influenza sequences and comparing them with phylogenetic trees

This afternoon, I was working on educational activities and suddenly realized that the H1N1 strain that caused the California outbreak might be the same strain that caused an outbreak in 2007 at an Ohio country fair. UPDATE: I’m not so certain anymore that the strains are the same. I’m doing some work with nucleic acid…