hit counter joomla

DNA sequencing

Tag archives for DNA sequencing

This the third part of case study where we see what happens when high school students clone and sequence genomic plant DNA. In this last part, we use the results from an automated comparison program to determine if the students cloned any genes at all and, if so, which genes were cloned. (You can also…

This the second part of three part case study where we see what happens when high school students clone and sequence genomic plant DNA. In this part, we do a bit of forensics to see how well their sequencing worked and to see if we can anything that could help them improve their results the…

What happens when high school students clone and sequence genomic DNA? Background DNA sequencing is a wonderful tool for discovery and a great technique for getting students involved in molecular science. This fall, Bio-Rad will officially begin selling their DNA cloning and sequencing kit. Now, students across the country will have the tools in hand…

I know some of you enjoy looking at data and seeing if you can figure out what’s going on. For this Friday’s puzzler, I’m going to send you to FinchTalk, our company blog, to take a look at lots of data from a resequencing experiment that was done to look for SNPs and count alleles.…

One of my colleagues has a two part series on FinchTalk (starting today) that discusses uncertainty in measurement and what that uncertainty means for the present and Next Generation DNA sequencing technologies. I’ve been running into this uncertainty myself lately.

Which read(s): 1. contain either a SNP (a single nucleotide polymorphism) or a position where different members of a multi-gene family have a different base? C 2. doesn’t have any DNA? B 3. is a PCR product? A, B, and C.  All of three reads were obtained by sequencing PCR products, generated with the same…

Since DNA diagnostics companies seem to be sprouting like mushrooms after the rain, it seemed like a good time to talk about how DNA testing companies decipher meaning from the tests they perform. Last week, I wrote about interpreting DNA sequence traces and the kind of work that a data analyst or bioinformatics technician does…

We have lots of DNA samples from bacteria that were isolated from dirt. Now it’s time to our own metagenomics project and figure out what they are. Our class project is on a much smaller scale than the honeybee metagenomics project that I wrote about yesterday, but we’re using many of the same principles.

A few weeks ago, I did some “back-of-the-envelope” calculations to explain to a reader why genome sequencing costs so much. I estimated that, if JCV’s genome were sequenced at the cost advertised by university core laboratories, his genome would cost about $128 million. That was an estimate, of course. But what did it really cost?

“Come quickly, Watson,” said Sherlock Holmes, “I’ve been asked to review a mysterious sequence, whose importance I’m only now beginning to comprehend.” The unidentified stranger handed Holmes a piece of paper inscribed with symbols and said it was a map of unparalleled value.